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Auckland Transport

Drug and alcohol procedure

PRO-HS16-DRU

  1. Background and purpose

The purpose of this process is to support Auckland Transport’s (AT) drug and alcohol policy in maintaining a safe and healthy workplace free from the adverse effects of drugs and alcohol.

The following process sets out the standards and processes that will be applied in implementing the policy.

  1. Scope

This procedure applies to all AT employees, members of the public, visitors, and suppliers who may be affected by AT’s activities or who undertake activities on behalf of AT. This procedure is to be read in conjunction with the relevant AT Health and Safety Roles and Responsibilities Standard.

This procedure has been completed to align with AT’s health and safety framework.

  1. Responsibilities

Supplier Responsibilities

Auckland Transport (AT) will encourage all of its suppliers to develop and implement drug and alcohol policies that are, at a minimum, consistent with the Policy and this Process.

AT employees will report any concerns regarding a supplier’s possible misuse of drugs or alcohol to their manager or the appropriate person(s) within the relevant organisation.

Any supplier and/or personnel of a supplier that appears to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs will be asked to leave the place of work immediately. Before leaving they may be asked to submit to a drug and alcohol test. In addition, where a supplier is working in a safety sensitive area or post an incident they have possible involvement in, AT may ask the supplier (or, where relevant, their employees) to undertake drug and alcohol testing. If any supplier or their employees refuse to undertake a test, or submits a “not negative” or positive test, they may be denied future entry to AT's premises and could be refused future work/contracts.

At AT's discretion, any such supplier and/or personnel of a supplier may be allowed to return to an AT place of work if AT is satisfied that the supplier (or the employee) is effectively managing the issue which may include random drug and alcohol testing.

  1. Prohibited Substances

All employees must report to work, and remain throughout the working day, in a fit and safe condition to undertake their duties and must not be under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other substance of abuse. For the purpose of the Policy, the working day includes any period the employee is rostered on call.

An employee will be considered under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or any other substance of abuse if they have:

  • a level of alcohol above 100 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath while at work; or
  • a level of alcohol above 100 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath while driving/operating a work vehicle; or
  • a urine level of a drug and/or metabolite that exceeds the confirmatory concentrations in Table 2 of the Australian / New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4308:2008 “Procedures for specimen collection and detection and quantitation of drugs of abuse in urine”.

No employee is permitted to possess, consume, trade, sell, or store drugs or drug paraphernalia in the workplace or bring AT into disrepute by engaging in such activities outside work.

No employee shall, even with the best of intentions, knowingly ‘cover up’ for or collude with a colleague with a drug or alcohol problem but instead should encourage the individual to seek help. Where an individual chooses not to seek help and their colleagues genuinely believe they may be misusing drugs and/or alcohol which adversely affects their role at work, those colleagues have a duty to raise their concerns with the individual’s manager or HR. We are all responsible for keeping our colleagues healthy and our workplace safe.

  1. Education and Training

Education material, which supports the Policy, will be available to all staff.

Training workshops for selected managers and supervisors will also be made available. These workshops focus on:

  • drugs and alcohol trends and their adverse effects;
  • use/misuse/abuse/dependency;
  • signs and symptoms to recognise drug and alcohol misuse;
  • reasonable cause for testing;
  • understanding AT’s Drug and Alcohol Policy and the testing options;
  • understanding the testing processes;
  • how long substances can be detected after use.
  1. Prescription medication

All employees should ensure that their Doctor/Pharmacist is aware of the nature of their work and ensures, as far as practicable, that any prescribed or “over-the-counter” medicines will not affect their ability to perform their duties satisfactorily and safely and that any potential side effects are fully explained (e.g. dizziness, fatigue, altered perception, mood swings or loss of coordination).

Any employee on prescribed or over-the-counter medication that may impact their performance, judgement or behaviour or otherwise affect their ability to perform their duties satisfactorily and safely must notify their manager or Human Resources (HR) before returning to or commencing work. This is so that AT can take any necessary steps with a view to providing a safe workplace, such as temporarily assigning to alternative duties or requiring the taking of appropriate leave entitlements.

Any employee who experiences side effects from any prescription medication or over-the-counter medicine that may affect their ability to perform their duties satisfactorily and safely must notify their manager or HR without delay.

Employees will not be obliged to disclose the medical condition being treated nor the medication taken. However AT reserves the right to request a copy of the relevant prescription and/or a Doctor’s certificate covering the use of the medicine.

  1. Testing for drugs and alcohol

Detailed information on the types of testing that AT will carry out and the processes and procedures associated with this testing are set out in Appendix 1 "Testing Procedures". Refer to section 14 of this Process for definitions of terms used in the associated Policy and this Process.

Reasons to Test

Testing for the presence of drugs and/or alcohol will be conducted as part of pre-employment screening for “safety sensitive roles and may also be conducted:

  1. If there is reasonable cause to suspect an employee’s fitness for work is affected by the consumption of alcohol or drugs (refer to Appendix 2 for examples of reasonable cause indicators);
  2. Following an incident where there was actual or potential for serious harm, loss, or property damage;
  3. Randomly, by agreement, for individuals who have previously tested positive for either drugs or alcohol.

Drug Testing

The collection and testing of samples for drugs will only be carried out by Authorised Collectors under the Australian/New Zealand Standard 4308:2008 “Procedures for the collection, detection, and quantitation of drugs of abuse in urine” or any later amendments to that standard.

An employee will be considered to have failed the test where the level of illegal drug, party drug, or prescribed drug in a sample of the employee’s urine is greater than the accepted international standard as defined by AS/NZS 4308:2008 or any updated version.

If a "not negative result" is produced, or there are concerns about specimen integrity, the specimen will be sent to the accredited laboratory for confirmatory testing. AT will suspend the employee, on pay, while they wait for the results of the confirmatory test.

If the employee produces a positive result, they can choose to have a duplicate sample tested, at their cost, by an independent laboratory of their choice that is accredited to Section 5 of AS/NZS 4308:2008. The test results are to be sent directly to AT. A condition of taking the second test is that the employee agrees to AT suspending them without pay, while they wait for the results of the duplicate sample test.

An employee can also choose to have the sample re-tested at their cost. However, the level of the drug in the re-tested sample may have decreased during sample storage and a re-test result is only required to confirm the presence of the drug or metabolite in the sample and not the level of the drug or metabolite to be considered confirmation of a positive test.

Alcohol Testing

Breath alcohol tests will be conducted using an Approved Testing Device which meets the Australian Standard: AS3547:1997/Amendment 1-2000 (Type 2) “Breath Alcohol Testing devices for Personal use” and any later amendments to that standard.

An employee will be considered to have failed the test (produced a positive result) where:

  • The level of alcohol in a sample of the employee’s breath is greater than:
  • 100 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath where the employee is at a place of work; or
  • 100 micrograms of alcohol per litre of breath where the employee is/has been driving or operating a work vehicle.
  • If the first test is positive, a confirmatory test on the same device (using a new mouth piece) will be conducted after a 15 to 20 minute period. The time and results will be recorded using the form in Appendix 4.

Tampering with Tests

Where there is reasonable cause to suspect that an employee has tampered with a specimen or attempted to adulterate the specimen or collection procedure or otherwise sought to cheat the test then those actions will be considered a breach of the Policy and this Process.

Refusing Testing

Refusing to provide a sample without a reasonable reason may be treated as a breach of Policy. Behaviour that constitutes a refusal to submit to a test includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Refusal to consent to a test.
  • Failing to advise, in a timely manner, of an accident/incident where the nature of the accident/incident is such that it would require alcohol or drug testing.
  • Inability to provide sufficient quantities of breath or urine to be tested within the three hour maximum time limit without a valid medical explanation.
  • Tampering with or attempting to adulterate the specimen or collection procedure.
  • Leaving the scene of an incident/accident without a valid reason before the test has been conducted.
  1. Company functions & events

Alcohol may be supplied for company functions and events (both on-site and off-site) at the discretion of an executive manager in accordance with AT’s Staff Functions Policy.

Employees must abide by the Drug and Alcohol Policy at any social event at which alcoholic beverages are served where they are at work, are representing AT, or must return to work after the event. All employees must take personal responsibility for their own behaviour and actions with regard to the consumption of alcohol and ensure that they remain in a condition to be able to get home safely and ensure that, if they are required to work the following day or are rostered on call, they are not in breach of the Policy upon their return to work.

The following guidelines shall be followed for any AT staff function:

  • A designated management representative with responsibility for the function should be at the function at all times. In the event that person leaves they must delegate responsibility to another appropriate person.
  • A designated area and clear time limits should be stipulated and adhered to.
  • Food and non-alcoholic drinks must be provided.
  • Careful consideration must be given to alternative transportation arrangements.
  • Inappropriate and anti-social behaviour should be managed in the same way as if the incident occurred in the ordinary workplace.
  • Employees are required to meet the same standard of behaviour required from them in their ordinary workplace. Drinking to excess will not be considered as an excuse for failing to meet this standard.
  • Employees must present themselves for work, in a fit, and proper state.

Managers should take into consideration that their approach to alcohol in the workplace plays a key role in setting an example to staff as to what is acceptable.

  1. Dependency and Rehabilitation

AT recognises that alcohol and other drug dependencies are a health problem that requires special treatment and help rather than being solely a disciplinary matter. In treating any dependency, early identification is seen as more likely to lead to successful treatment and, consequently, AT will support any employee who voluntarily seeks assistance and treatment. AT may also require an employee to participate in a compulsory drug and alcohol rehabilitation where the employee has returned a positive drug and/or alcohol test.

Voluntary Rehabilitation

AT encourages and supports employees who voluntarily seek assistance for substance abuse problems. Employees shall utilise their entitlement in respect of approved sick or annual leave to participate in a rehabilitation programme without jeopardising their continued employment with AT.

Voluntary participation in treatment programmes will not prevent disciplinary action where deemed appropriate by AT for incidents that have already occurred, or for incidents that occur whilst an employee is partaking in a voluntary rehabilitation programme.

Entry and participation in a voluntary rehabilitation programme will not adversely affect an employee’s future employment opportunities, and no employee will be discriminated against for participating voluntarily in the programme.

Compulsory Rehabilitation

Where an employee returns a positive drug and/or alcohol test result, AT will determine whether it is appropriate to take any disciplinary action against the employee, up to and including, dismissal. If an employee’s employment is not terminated, AT will require the employee to participate in a compulsory drug and alcohol rehabilitation programme. Entry into compulsory rehabilitation does not prevent AT from carrying out appropriate disciplinary action.

If the employee refuses to participate in a rehabilitation programme or starts the programme but drops out during it they will be subject to disciplinary action which may include dismissal.

Terms of Rehabilitation

AT’s support to employees in rehabilitation will extend to:

  1. Access to the Employee Assistance Programme;
  2. Considering any alcohol or drug dependency to be an illness covered under the Sick Leave Policy;
  3. Identifying possible alternative duties where the current duties and responsibilities are considered a possible obstacle to recovery;
  4. Agreeing on an appropriate rehabilitation plan with the employee.

Any agreed rehabilitation plan shall require the employee to take their leave entitlement or be subject to leave without pay until they have returned a negative drug/alcohol test and are considered fit to return to work.

On completion of an agreed rehabilitation, the employee will be subject to up to six unannounced follow-up drug and/or alcohol tests per year over the following 24 months. These tests may look for the presence of any amount of the drug or alcohol (ie it is not restricted to cut-off levels). A second positive test following a return to work either during or outside the treatment period will be considered a breach of Policy (see section10).

AT reserves the right to determine what hours, tasks and/or roles a person fulfils while they are undergoing treatment for alcohol or drug dependency.

Any employee entering into a rehabilitation programme will be required to sign the Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Contract (as set out in Appendix 5).

  1. Information Management

Any information collected or volunteered under this Policy will be treated with as much confidentiality as is legally possible. Any documentation will only be kept on the individual’s personal file held by HR. The only exception to this is where a breach of Policy (see section 10) requires the Police to be notified.

  1. Breach of Policy

A breach of the Drug and Alcohol Policy and associated Process will be treated as a disciplinary matter and may lead to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

Examples of issues that will be seen as a breach of the Policy include but are not limited to:

  • Being incapable of performing normal duties satisfactorily and safely as a result of consuming alcohol or taking drugs. For the purposes of this Process, a positive test for drugs or alcohol above the stated maximums will be considered as being in an unsatisfactory, unfit and unsafe condition;
  • Possession, consumption, dealing/trafficking, selling, or the storage of drugs or drug paraphernalia at work;
  • Being convicted of any criminal offence connected with drugs where the conviction may affect their ability to undertake their role or could bring AT in disrepute;
  • Refusing to provide a sample for testing without good reason;
  • Tampering with a specimen or otherwise attempting to cheat the testing procedure;
  • Failing to comply with rehabilitation requirements.

As well as facing disciplinary action, any employee caught dealing/trafficking, selling, or storing controlled drugs at work will be reported to the Police.

  1. Process for Review

The AT’s Drug and Alcohol Policy and Processs will be reviewed annually and changes may occur at the discretion of the organisation where they are deemed to be necessary. These changes will be deemed to be in force once employees have been notified via a consultative process.

  1. Records

Record

Location

Responsibility

Retention

Expires

Test Results

Personnel Files

People, Service And Performance

5 Years

Yes

  1. Definitions

See also H&S Definitions

Adulteration

Deliberate use of a substance to compromise, or attempt to compromise, the integrity of a urine sample in order to attempt to “beat” the drug test: eg specimen dilution, using a masking agent, or providing a substitute urine specimen.

Alcohol

Includes any substance or beverage that contains ethyl alcohol including, but not limited to, beer, wine, pre-mix drinks and other spirits.

Breath Alcohol Testing Device (breathalyser)

A Breath Alcohol Testing device is a unit designed to accurately measure breath alcohol content. The unit must meet the Australian Standard: AS 3547-1997/ Amendment 1-2000 (Type 2) “Breath Alcohol testing devices for Personal use” and any later amendments to the standard.

Chain of Custody

A series of procedures to account for the integrity of each specimen by tracking its handling and storage from the point of specimen collection to final disposal of the urine.

Chain of Custody forms are used to document the data from the time of collection of the specimen, throughout the on-site screening process and (where required) its receipt by the laboratory as well as dispatch between laboratories. Thereafter, appropriate laboratory data systems and documentation account for the handling of the urine or aliquots within the laboratory.

Collector

Drugs

A person who has successfully completed NZQA qualifications demonstrating compliance with AS/NZS 4308: 2008 for:

  • specimen collection, handling, storage and dispatch of specimens, and
  • “on-site” screening and has received a statement of attainment in accordance with NZQA.

The two unit standards required are:

  • US 25458 “Perform urine specimen collection in the workplace for drug testing.”
  • US 25511 “Perform urine drug screening in the workplace.”

Alcohol

A person who has been trained to use a Breath Alcohol Testing device in compliance with the testing procedures detailed in AS3547:1997 / Amendment 1-2000 (Type 2) and any subsequent amendments.

Cut-off Concentration (drugs)

  • A urine level of drug and/ or metabolite, dictated by Table 2 of the Australian/New Zealand Standard, AS/NZS 4308:2008 at and above which the confirmed result will be reported by the laboratory as “positive” and below which it will be reported as “negative”
  • A urine level of drug and/ or metabolite, not listed in Table 2 of the Australian/New Zealand Standard, AS/NZS 4308:2008, at and above which the laboratory will report the result as “positive” and below which it will be reported as “negative.”

Drug

Illicit, restricted and some currently legal drugs which have the potential to cause impairment, eg cannabis and hashish, opiates (such as heroin and morphine) cocaine, amphetamine type substances (speed, “P”, ecstasy and party pills containing benzylpiperazine), synthetic THC, cathinone derivatives. The term also includes misuse of some prescription drugs (eg tranquillisers, sedatives) and other currently legal party pills and herbal highs. Other “mind altering” substances can be added to the testing suite as they become available and are misused.

Integrity Testing

Testing for substances that affect the detection or quantitation of drugs or metabolites in the specimen.

Laboratory

A testing facility accredited against AS/NZS 4308:2008 (or any updates) at which the analytical procedures are carried out to screen for and/or confirm the presence of a specific drug or its metabolite(s) and report positive results only if the drug/ metabolite is at or above the confirmatory cut-off concentration.

Prescription Medication & “over-the-counter” Medications

Legal substances used by employees to assist with recognised medical conditions, including both prescription and over the counter drugs/medication.

Metabolite

A metabolite is a breakdown product of a drug that may be less toxic and easier to excrete than the substance taken. Some drugs are not broken down, but they are converted into a form that is more water soluble. They are also metabolites.

Negative Alcohol Test

Means a level of alcohol (micrograms per litre (µg/litre) of breath) below that specified in AT’s Drug and Alcohol Policy and associated Process.

Negative Drug Test

Means that as the result of a urine screening test (on-site or laboratory) and/ or a confirmed laboratory testing of the urine, either no drug(s) and/ or metabolite(s) are detected or the concentration(s) of drug(s) and/ or metabolite(s) detected are either:

  • below the screening or confirmatory cut-off concentration(s) specified in tables 1 and 2 of AS/NZS 4308:2008 (see table 2: Section 16.3), or
  • below the confirmatory cut-off concentration determined by the laboratory for those substances not tabled in AS/NZS 4308: 2008.

Not Negative Drug Test

If the on-site screening device indicates the possible presence of a drug class (using the screening test cut off concentration(s) as defined by Table 1 of AS/NZ 4308:2008) or if the specimen integrity is in question, the result is reported as not negative. The collector shall dispatch the specimen (split into more than one sample) to the laboratory for confirmatory testing.

An interim report may be issued that can only advise that the specimen requires further laboratory testing, ie no indication of what caused the not negative.

On-site Screening Test

An Immunoassay device used to exclude the presence of drugs and/or metabolites in urine at the site of specimen collection and which has been verified in accordance with Appendix B of AS/NZS 4308:2008 (or any updates)

This test must be carried out by a NZQA qualified collector. In the event that the specimen gives a not negative screen it must be sent to a laboratory for confirmatory testing.

Positive Alcohol Test

Means a level of alcohol (micrograms per litre (µg/litre) of breath) above that specified in AT’s Drug and Alcohol Policy and associated Process.

Positive Drug Test

Means that as a result of laboratory confirmatory testing of the urine the concentration(s) of drug(s) and/ or metabolite(s) recorded are either:

  • above the confirmatory cut-off concentration(s) specified in table 2 of AS/NZS 4308:2008 (section 16.3), or
  • above the confirmatory cut-off concentration determined by the laboratory for those substances not tabled in AS/NZS 4308: 2008.

Safety Sensitive Role

Any role that is required to work in and around operational areas, including construction sites, the rail corridor, and the road corridor, or could be called upon to make decisions that affect the safety of employees, suppliers, customers, or the general public.

Workplace / Worksite / Site

A reference to a workplace, worksite or site includes all premises (whether owned, leased, or controlled by or on behalf of AT), including offices, operational sites, and company vehicles.

Work Vehicle

A work vehicle includes any AT owned and or operated vehicle and any private vehicle used for work purposes.

Related policy

Appendix 1: Testing Procedures

1.1 Pre-employment Testing

Appointment of a new employee is conditional on the applicant returning a negative drug test. The requirements will not apply to existing employees transferring to a new role. To avoid doubt, ex-employees applying for a position with AT will be subject to the same conditions as new candidates, regardless of the time that has elapsed since the last day of their previous employment with AT.

Procedure

  1. The applicant is informed that any offer of employment is subject to a drug test. This may be included in a medical check.
  2. Where an applicant is to be offered a position they will be required to sign an informed consent form (appendix 3).
  3. The applicant will be directed to a NZQA qualified specimen collector and “On-Site” screener to collect the urine and either conduct an “on-site” screening test or forward it to an accredited laboratory for drug screening.
  4. The applicant must provide verification by photo ID (eg driver’s licence, passport).
  5. Any specimen giving either a “not negative” screen for a drug class or an indication that the integrity is suspect will be forwarded to the accredited laboratory for confirmatory testing.
  6. The applicant must not commence employment until a negative drug test has been returned.
  7. Any applicant refusing to take the drug test will not be considered for a position.
  8. An applicant returning a positive test will not be considered for a position.

1.2 Post Incident Testing

An employee may be tested for the presence of drugs and/or alcohol where they are involved in any of the following circumstances affecting employees or customers:

  1. An incident involving death or a lost time injury.
  2. An incident requiring hospital treatment.
  3. An incident or near miss that had the potential to cause serious harm or loss.
  4. An incident involving damage to vehicle, property, plant or equipment.

Procedure

The manager or the employee’s supervisor must:

  1. Determine whether there is sufficient cause to test for drugs/alcohol. If the incident is sufficiently serious, the testing will be automatic for all persons involved.
  2. Assess whether it is practical to require a test. (Where it is not practical for a test to be carried out immediately due to the injuries to the employee or where the circumstance requires any testing to be delayed, the manager or supervisor must:
  3. Ensure that the employee is accompanied to the hospital/doctor so that the required tests can be carried out as soon as practicable.
  4. If the injuries preclude immediate tests, ensure the tests are carried out at the first practical opportunity.)
  5. Advise the employee that they are required to undergo the test and advise them that they may consult their representative at this time but the testing cannot be delayed. (NB: If possible, the alcohol test should be conducted within 1 hour and the urine specimen collected for the drug test within 3 hours).
  6. Obtain written consent from the employee (appendicies 3 & 4).
  7. From the time of notification, arrange for the employee to be accompanied at all times and escorted to the designated NZQA qualified collector and “on-site” screener and trained breath testing provider. The accompanying person will be required to ensure that the employee has independent verification of identity (ID) available for documenting on the chain-of-custody form. (NB: The accompanying person personally verifying the employee’s ID is not considered unequivocal independent verification).
  8. If either the alcohol test is positive or the urine drug screen is “not negative” or its integrity is suspect, the employee is removed from the work site (in accordance with AT's suspension rights set out in this Policy) until the confirmed test results are available from the accredited confirmatory laboratory subject to a decision on possible disciplinary action.
  9. AT may request that the laboratory tests for additional drugs (eg synthetic THC, party drug, LSD, cathinone derivatives) which will not be covered by the normal screening. It is necessary to inform the laboratory that these additional tests are required

1.3 Reasonable Cause

An employee may be required to undertake a test for alcohol and/or drugs where there is reason to suspect that their actions, appearance, behaviour or performance may be affected by drugs and/or alcohol. In practice there should be at least two people who have seen the employee and both have reason to believe that the person may be affected. One of these

An employee may be required to undertake a test for alcohol and/or drugs where there is reason to suspect that their actions, appearance, behaviour or performance may be affected by drugs and/or alcohol. In practice there should be at least two people who have seen the employee and both have reason to believe that the person may be affected. One of these people should be a manager/ supervisor who has received appropriate training.

The manager / supervisor should consult with the relevant HR Consultant before implementing the Reasonable Cause procedure.

Some reasonable cause indicators & grounds for testing are listed in appendix 2.

A specialist drug detection dog team may conduct periodic unannounced inspections of the AT’s work sites. These inspections will be carried out to detect the presence of drugs.

If a drug detection dog provides a positive indication of the recent possession and/or use of drug(s) on:

  • An employee
  • A work vehicle that the employee has either driven or travelled either to or from work or during that shift.
  • A locker, clothing, or equipment provided by AT for the employee’s use or that the employee is responsible for.

The person(s) concerned will be asked to undertake a drug test under the reasonable cause component of this Process.

Any employee who has entered into a voluntary drug and/or alcohol rehabilitation programme will be subject to up to six unannounced follow-up random drug and/or alcohol tests per year over a 2 year period under the reasonable cause provisions of this Process.=

Procedure

If, in consultation with the relevant HR Consultant, sufficient cause to test for drugs and/or alcohol is determined, the manager/ supervisor must:

  1. Advise the employee that they are required to undergo the test and advise them that they may consult their representative at this time but the testing cannot be delayed. (NB: If possible, the alcohol test should be conducted within 1 hour and the urine specimen collected for the drug test within 3 hours).
  2. Obtain written consent from the employee (appendices 3 & 4).
  3. From the time of notification, arrange for the employee to be accompanied at all times and escorted to the designated NZQA qualified collector and “on-site” screener and trained breath testing provider. The accompanying person will be required to ensure that the employee has independent verification of identity (ID) available for documenting on the chain-of-custody form. (NB: The accompanying person personally verifying the employee’s ID is not considered unequivocal independent verification).
  4. If either the alcohol test is positive or the urine drug screen is “not negative” or its integrity is suspect, the employee is removed from the work site (in accordance with AT's suspension rights set out in this Policy) until the confirmed test results are available from the accredited confirmatory laboratory subject to a decision on possible disciplinary action.
  5. AT may request that the laboratory tests for additional drugs (eg synthetic THC, party drug, LSD, cathinone derivatives) which will not be covered by the normal screening. It is necessary to inform the laboratory that these additional tests are required.

Appendix 2: Reasonable cause indicators

When assessing for reasonable cause, there will usually be more than one indicator present. Examples of reasonable cause include, but are not limited to the following:

Physical evidence

  • possession or association with an illicit substance
  • possession or association with drug paraphernalia
  • positive identification by a drug detection dog

Physical sign

  • smelling breath, body odour, clothes
  • slurred speech
  • unsteady on feet
  • eyes: bloodshot, dilated pupils, pin-point pupils
  • excessive sweating
  • flushed/ red complexion
  • loss of weight
  • changes in appearance – clothing, hair personal hygiene

Other

  • unusual or out of character on-site behaviour
  • continual involvement in small accidents or inattention
  • obvious continual drop in performance
  • changes in personality or mood swings
  • excessive lateness
  • absences often on Monday, Friday or in conjunction with holidays
  • increased health problems or complaints about health
  • emotional signs: outbursts, anger, aggression, mood swings, irritability
  • paranoia
  • changes in alertness – difficulty with attention span
  • less energy
  • feigning sickness or emergencies to get out of work early
  • going to the bathroom more than normal
  • defensive when confronted about behaviour
  • dizziness
  • hangovers
  • violent behaviour
  • impaired motor skills
  • impaired or reduced short term memory
  • reduced ability to perform tasks requiring concentration and co-ordination
  • intense anxiety or panic attacks or depression
  • impairments in learning and memory, perception and judgement.

Appendix 3: Consent for drug testing

Download appendix 3: Consent for drug testing form (PDF 112KB)

Appendix 4: Consent for Breath Alcohol Testing

Download appendix 4: Consent for breath alcohol testing form (PDF 106KB)

Appendix 5: Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Contract

Download appendix 5: Drug and alcohol rehabilitation contract (PDF 114KB)