Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan 2013

Auckland Transport: An Auckland Council Organisation

Adapted in accordance with Section 69 of the Copyright Act 1994 by the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind, for the sole use of persons who have a print disability. Produced 2014 by Accessible Format Production, Blind Foundation, Auckland, New Zealand. This edition is a transcription of the following print edition:

Auckland Transport, 6 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson, Auckland.

© Auckland Transport, 2013

For more information visit www.aucklandtransport.govt.nz/rptp

Transcriber's Note

Images have been omitted from this e-text edition. In the case of maps, brief descriptions have been provided. For full verbal descriptions, please contact Auckland Transport on (09) 366 6400.

In tables where cells had been left blank by the publisher, the word "blank" has been added.

Contents

Foreword – Page 5

Executive summary – Page 6

1 Introduction – Page 16

1.1 Purpose of this plan – Page 17

1.2 Reasons for this review – Page 18

1.3 Scope of this plan – Page 18

1.4 Consultation and submissions – Page 18

2 Strategic context – Page 20

2.1 Statutory requirements – Page 21

2.2 Key strategic drivers – Page 21

2.3 Public transport funding – Page26

3 Our current public transport system – Page 28

3.1 Current system – Page 29

3.2 Recent developments – Page 29

3.3 Issues and challenges – Page 30

4 What we want to achieve – Page 34

5 Key directions – Page 38

6 Policies and actions – Page 48

6.1 Network structure – Page 50

6.2 Integrated service network – Page 52

6.3 Infrastructure – Page 56

6.4 Service quality – Page 60

6.5 Fares and ticketing – Page 64

6.6 Customer interface – Page 67

6.7 Assisting the transport disadvantaged – Page 70

6.8 Procurement and exempt services – Page 73

6.9 Funding and prioritisation – Page 78

6.10 Monitoring and review – Page 82

7 Description of services – Page 84

7.1 Scheduled services – current network – Page 86

7.2 Scheduled services – new network – Page 87

7.3 Targeted services – Page 91

8 Implementation plan – Page 92

8.1 Implementation timetable – Page 94

8.2 Service design and subsequent review process – Page 96

Glossary – Page 100

Acronyms – Page 103

Appendix 1: Proposed future service network – Page 105

Appendix 2: Schedule of current (2013) services – Page 127

Appendix 3: Statutory requirements – Page 163

Appendix 4: Policy environment – Page 165

Appendix 5: Public Transport Interchange Design – Page 171

Appendix 6: Farebox recovery assessment – Page 175

Appendix 7: Transport-disadvantaged assessment – Page 179

Appendix 8: Transition to PTOM contracts – Page 185

Appendix 9: Policy on significance – Page 187

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Foreword

Auckland needs first-rate transport infrastructure and services to remain internationally competitive. An effective transport system will allow for growth, help to attract and retain business, enhance the experience of passengers and – importantly – get goods moving.

The Auckland Plan calls for a transformational shift in public transport if Auckland is to achieve its vision to become the world's most liveable city. It identifies the City Rail Link as a major transport priority and sets a challenging but achievable target of doubling the number of passenger trips over the next 10 years.

This Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan represents an important development towards achieving this transformation. It outlines the public transport services that Auckland Transport proposes for the region over the next 10 years.

The success of the Northern Busway and the increasing popularity of public transport, resulting from ongoing investment in infrastructure and services, confirms that Aucklanders will use quality public transport. We know that there needs to be a continued focus on fast, frequent, reliable and cost-effective services, clean and good-quality vehicles, shelter from the weather, and real-time service information. Major investment and work on rail electrification, new electric trains and integrated ticketing will benefit passengers soon.

Despite these successes, however, Auckland's public transport system still has challenges to meet. A major review of public transport identified that significant changes are needed if we are to provide a simpler, connected network which can deliver better levels of service to Aucklanders and better connections to the places they want to go.

Current sources of funding won't cover everything that needs to be done, so a key focus over the next decade will be on enhancing performance and gaining better value from existing investment. Changes to procurement arrangements and increasing recovery of operating costs through fares are two responses to a constrained funding environment.

The public transport system needs to improve in its delivery of economic and cost-effective services. The new Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM) will help to achieve this by creating an environment of true partnership between the public and private sector in the design, procurement and delivery of public transport services.

A key feature of this Plan is the introduction of a simpler, better-connected public transport network that is more attractive to people who don't use it at present. This will involve changing the current way that Aucklanders use to catch buses or trains – including the need for some passengers to transfer at key interchanges. In return, the improved public transport system will offer more frequent and reliable transport over a longer time span (seven days a week) and with easier access to more destinations.

Public feedback to the proposed network changes through the consultation process regarding this Plan has been overwhelmingly positive. This response gives us confidence that a transformation from the existing complex mix of public transport services to a mature citywide network of connected, reliable and frequent services can be successfully achieved. Auckland Transport is committed to working with the community as we now move into the implementation phase.

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Executive summary

This Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan has been prepared by Auckland Transport. It replaces the existing 2010 Regional Public Transport Plan and the Passenger Transport Network Plan prepared by the Auckland Regional Transport Authority in 2006.

This Plan describes the public transport network that Auckland Transport proposes for the region, identifies the services that are integral to that network over the next 10 years, and sets out the policies and procedures that apply to those services.

This Plan results from a number of recent changes to the planning and operating environment for public transport in Auckland, including:

A major focus of the Plan is on making the best use of available resources, and improving the frequency and range of travel options offered by public transport.

Statutory requirements

The statutory provisions relating to the regulation and management of public transport are contained in Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 (LTMA). This includes a set of principles that are intended to guide the actions of organisations such as Auckland Transport in undertaking their public transport functions. These principles include working in partnership with operators, the coordinated provision of services that will grow patronage, access for competitors, incentives to reduce reliance on subsidies, and transparency in planning and procurement of services.

Part 5 of the LTMA also sets out the matters that Auckland Transport must take into account in preparing a RPTP. The statutory purpose of the RPTP is to provide:

The Auckland Plan

The Auckland Plan identifies the transport system as crucial to achieving the vision for Auckland as being the world's most liveable city by 2041. The transport system also plays a key role in facilitating and supporting national economic growth and productivity.

The Auckland Plan identifies the need for a transformational shift in public transport and has set a number of challenging targets, including:

Issues and challenges

A number of improvements to public transport have been made in recent years, resulting in a strong increase in passenger numbers. Total patronage has more than doubled since the low point in the early 1990s, and is now

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at its highest level since the late 1950s. Significant ongoing investments in rail electrification, new electric trains and integrated ticketing are expected to further boost patronage in the short term.

Despite these successes, Auckland's public transport system still has shortcomings. The existing network of bus routes is complex, with around 400 different route variations. Many of these routes are infrequent, long and indirect. This results in customer confusion and duplicated resources. Public transport in Auckland can be particularly hard to understand for visitors to the city and occasional users of the system. When compared to car travel, many public transport trips are slow due to long waits between services and slow boarding and travel times.

Auckland Transport is committed to addressing these issues – but must do so within a constrained public transport funding environment. For this reason, a major focus over the next decade will be on enhancing network performance and earning higher value from the existing investment. To achieve this, the following combination of responses is included in this Plan:

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What we want to achieve

Our vision is for an integrated, efficient and effective public transport network that caters for a wider range of trips and is valued by Aucklanders.

To achieve this vision, Auckland's public transport system needs to deliver the following outcomes:

Auckland Transport has identified a series of measures that will help to judge our progress towards achieving these outcomes. Key measures are outlined below, with an indication of current performance and projected targets that reflect both the Auckland Plan targets and those considered achievable over the next 10 years within current funding provision:

Table:

Outcome

Measure

Current performance

Auckland Plan Target

Funded Target 2022

Services that align with Auckland's future land-use pattern

Percentage of households within 500 metres' walk of the rapid and frequent service network

14%

32% (2040)

40%

Services that meet customer needs (a)

Percentage of households within 500 metres' walk of a public transport stop

Approximately 80% in urban area

n.a.

90%

Services that meet customer needs (b)

Percentage of customers satisfied with their public transport service

87%

n.a.; 140.0

>90%; 103.3

Increased passenger numbers (a)

Total passenger boardings per annum

69.1 million

140 million (2022)

103 million

Increased passenger numbers (b)

Annual passenger boardings per capita

48.7 (urban area)

100 (2040)

57

Increased public transport mode share

Percentage of peak-period trips to central city made by public transport

47%

70% (2040)

55%

Improved value for money (a)

Farebox Recovery Ratio (FRR)

45%

n.a.

>50%

Improved value for money (b)

Operating subsidy per passenger kilometre

$0.27

n.a.

$0.25 (CPI adjusted)

End Table.

Achieving future targets is contingent on realising assumed land-use growth patterns, sufficient investment in public transport over the period and a positive response of the general public to service proposals.

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Key directions

Network planning for this Plan has focused on the changes and improvements needed to the public transport system before the completion of the City Rail Link.

This builds on the momentum being delivered by recent system improvements and other improvements that are in progress, including rail electrification, new electric rail units and integrated ticketing. The challenge is to do this in a way that better meets customer demands, while making best use of our limited transport resources.

The approach outlined in this Plan responds to these challenges by setting out a refined integrated network structure for Auckland's public transport system, to provide a city-wide connected and interlinked network of frequent and reliable services. This will improve levels of service through better utilisation of resources, delivering integrated and frequent services and more travel choices in a cost-effective manner. It will also support Auckland's future growth by providing a permanent network of frequent services and transport infrastructure that will provide greater certainty for land-use development decisions.

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New service categories

The new integrated service network structure is built around a core network of rapid and frequent services. These include the existing rapid transit services on rail and the Northern Busway, supplemented by a number of high-frequency bus routes connecting major centres.

The rapid and frequent service network will deliver at least a 15-minute service operating all day (initially from 7am to 7pm, with reduced frequencies outside those hours). It will be complemented by a network of connector routes that operate all day at half-hourly frequencies. In addition, a supporting network of local services, peak-only services and targeted services will cater for specific market needs. In combination, the services described in this Plan are integral to the operation of the new integrated network.

The network concept is illustrated below:

Diagram:

Transcriber's Note: The diagram text has been listed below. End Note.

Service layers:

Rapid

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 15 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Dedicated Right of Way

Frequent

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 15 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Priority measures required

Connector

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 30 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Priority measures required

Local, Peak-Only and Targeted

Defining features: Supporting Network

Minimum Frequency: Driven by demand

Operating Hours: Driven by demand

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Limited priority measures

End Diagram.

The main change from the current network pattern will be the much stronger focus on integration between services. This requires an equally strong focus on the development of convenient interchange facilities, high-frequency services and a simple integrated fare system.

Although some passengers will need to transfer between services to complete particular trips, this will be minimised by the provision of good interchange facilities, integrated ticketing and fares, and improved frequencies. An additional benefit results from access to a much wider set of destinations.

Policy framework

Chapter 6 provides the policy framework that will guide Auckland Transport's public transport decisions over the short to medium term, in order to make progress towards the longer-term vision and outcomes. It also describes the actions that Auckland Transport intends to take to implement those policies.

The objectives and policies are summarised opposite:

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Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policy area and objective; Policies. End Note.

1. Network structure

A permanent network of connected frequent services that supports Auckland's future growth

1.1 Provide a core network of frequent and reliable services

1.2 Maximise access to rapid and frequent services from the urban area

1.3 Provide connections to the rapid and frequent service network

1.4 Encourage mutually supportive land use and public transport development policies

1.5 Integrate public transport services with parking policies

2. Integrated service network

Simple integrated services that connect people with where they want to go

2.1 Provide a simple, layered network of public transport services

2.2 Ensure good access to public transport services from all parts of the urban area

2.3 Provide a public transport network that maximises the range of travel options and destinations available

2.4 Integrate ferry services into the public transport network

2.5 Enable timely and cost-effective service provision in developing urban areas

2.6 Ensure that services respond to identified customer needs

2.7 Maintain consistent levels of service in each service layer appropriate to demand

2.8 Enable timely and cost-effective service adjustments to meet demand

2.9 Co-ordinate services for special events to help meet the needs of the event and reduce demands on other parts of the transport system

2.10 Investigate inter-regional services

3. Infrastructure

A high standard of public transport infrastructure that supports service provision and enhances customer experience

3.1 Integrate infrastructure and service provision

3.2 Provide well-designed transport interchanges on the rapid and frequent service network

3.3 Provide accessible customer-focused facilities appropriate to the public transport route and the immediate locality

3.4 Provide bus priority measures on key corridors

3.5 Provide Park and Ride facilities at appropriate sites

3.6 Integrate public transport with cycling and walking

4. Service quality

A convenient and reliable public transport system using modern vehicles

4.1 Develop realistic, achievable timetables that are reliable and dependable

4.2 Improve public transport journey times to provide a service that is competitive with car travel

4.3 Provide a reliable, punctual, customer-focused network of services

4.4 Ensure that all vehicles and vessels meet required standards

4.5 Ensure that service agreements encourage good operator performance

4.6 Monitor and continuously improve service delivery

5. Fares and ticketing

A fares and ticketing system that attracts and retains customers, while balancing user contributions against public funding

5.1 Implement a fares and ticketing system that supports public transport service integration

5.2 Provide integrated fares and ticketing across all bus, rail and ferry services

5.3 Investigate zone-based fare structure with standard fares across bus and rail operators

5.4 Simplify the range of fare products available

5.5 Maintain fares at a level that will achieve farebox recovery targets

5.6 Provide incentives to use integrated tickets

5.7 Provide concession fares for target groups

5.8 Provide off-peak discounts to spread peak demand and improve operational efficiency

5.9 Ensure that all users pay the correct fare

6. Customer interface

Simple, visible, and intuitive customer information and service

6.1 Use customer feedback to continually enhance the product

6.2 Provide a consistent brand for Auckland Transport throughout the region

6.3 Provide range of marketing material to attract potential customers

6.4 Provide a wide choice of information channels for customers to plan their journeys

6.5 Provide real-time passenger information

6.6 Provide a high quality travel experience

6.7 Improve the connection infrastructure

6.8 Provide a range of customer feedback channels

7. Assist the transport disadvantaged

Improved access for communities and groups whose needs are not met by the regular public transport system

7.1 Provide a public transport network that is accessible and safe, particularly for vulnerable users

7.2 Provide transport services and facilities for customers whose needs are not met by the regular public transport network

7.3 Provide safe public transport access for school students to and from their zoned and/or nearest school

7.4 Provide concessionary fares for the transport-disadvantaged and other target groups

7.5 Support public transport services and facilities that better meet the needs of individual rural and isolated communities, taking into account value for money and local initiatives

7.6 Ensure that transport services and facilities account for socio-economic characteristics

8. Procurement and exempt services

A procurement system that supports the efficient delivery of public transport services

8.1 Ensure the appropriate allocation of roles, responsibilities and risk between Auckland Transport and operators, using the PTOM

8.2 Ensure service continuity to the travelling public

8.3 Identify specific exempt services that are not subject to PTOM contracts

8.4 Adopt a partnership approach to network planning and service changes

8.5 Ensure that rail services procurement recognises the need to complete the transition to fully electrified system

8.6 Manage the transition from current contracts to the future PTOM contracting environment

8.7 Ensure that the operation of exempt services does not adversely affect the wider public transport network

9. Funding and prioritisation

Effective an efficient allocation of public transport funding

9.1 Improve value for money from existing public transport funding

9.2 Increase the level of farebox recovery

9.3 Direct available funding to high priority activities

9.4 Encourage the development of new funding mechanisms for public transport

10. Monitoring and review

A system of monitoring and review that supports continuous improvement

10.1 Undertake regular monitoring and reporting of service and system performance

10.2 Regularly review and update the Plan to account for changing circumstances

10.3 Ensure appropriate public consultation on future Plan variations

End Table.

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Service and unit descriptions

This Plan describes the services that Auckland Transport has identified as being integral to the regional public transport network in Auckland. It includes service descriptions for geographically defined units, which generally group together all of the services in a specific area and/or corridor with at least parts of their routes in common.

These unit descriptions are set out in Chapter 7 and Appendix 1. Details of targeted services, including school buses and Total Mobility services, are also provided.

Implementation plan

The changes to the network structure outlined in this Plan represent a significant change in the way that public transport services are delivered in Auckland. Implementation across the whole region will require a detailed assessment of the specific route structure in each area. This assessment needs input from the community to ensure that local needs are identified and taken into account.

To achieve this, a staged implementation of the new network structure is proposed, with three main stages implemented over a three-year period, as follows:

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To facilitate these changes, a number of infrastructure improvements will be required. These are described in Chapter 8. Beyond 2016, significant further improvements will be enabled by the implementation of the City Rail Link, with associated capacity increases and new rail stations.

Implementing the network changes described above will require a major public engagement exercise.

Feedback on the specific local details, e.g. detailed routing, the mixture of local services, location of stops and other infrastructure matters will be gathered through local targeted engagement exercises prior to the procurement of services, as part of the PTOM contracting process.

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1 Introduction

This chapter shows how this Plan fits within the overall transport planning framework for the Auckland region. It also describes the proposed public transport services over the next 10 years, why this new Plan is needed, its scope and the public consultation process.

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1.1 Purpose of this plan

This is the Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP or Plan). It has been prepared by Auckland Transport, in line with the requirements of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 (LTMA). The Plan describes the public transport network that Auckland Transport proposes for the region, identifies the services that are integral to that network over the next 10 years and sets out the objectives, policies and procedures that apply to those services.

Improved public transport is a critical component of overall plans to lift the performance of Auckland's transport system, improve quality of life for the city's growing population and build Auckland's economic competitiveness. This Plan shows the actions that Auckland Transport intends to take to provide a better public transport future. Figure 1-1 shows how the Plan fits into Auckland's overall strategic planning framework.

Diagram:

Figure 1-1: Strategic planning framework for Auckland

Transcriber's Note: The diagram text has been listed below, with numbers added to indicate flowchart order. A note to the diagram reads: *NZTA provide input. End Note.

Auckland Council

[1] Auckland Plan: Purpose: Multi-objective plan for the Auckland region; 30 Year timeframe; Statutory

Auckland Transport

[2] Integrated Transport Programme*: Purpose: 30 Year timeframe, 10 years in detail; Gives effect to the transport components of the Auckland Plan; Focuses on integrating all transport modes into a single transport system

[3] Regional Public Transport Plan – Statutory; Regional Asset Management Plan – Statutory; Regional Arterial Roads workstream; Road Safety workstream; Active Transport workstream: Purpose: 10 Year timeframe; Regional Public Transport Plan and Regional Asset Management Plan; Statutory; Provides more detailed programmes and deliverables

[4] Regional Land Transport Plan*: Purpose: 10 Year timeframe, 3 years in detail; Statutory; Prioritised list of transport projects to describe funding requirements

Long Term Plan: Purpose: 10 Year timeframe; Statutory; Sets out the activities, services and projects and the required funding; AT is required to give effect to the LTP

End Diagram.

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1.2 Reasons for this review

The previous RPTP was adopted by the former Auckland Regional Transport Authority in 2010. Since then, a number of changes have occurred to the planning and operating environment for public transport in Auckland, and these have resulted in the need to prepare a new Plan.

The key changes are:

This Plan also replaces the Passenger Transport Network Plan prepared by the Auckland Regional Transport Authority in 2006.

1.3 Scope of this plan

This Plan covers all public transport services in the Auckland region that receive financial support from Auckland Transport.

While the Plan is for the whole of Auckland, its focus is on the metropolitan area and some peripheral areas where public transport services operate. This includes the Hibiscus Coast, the western corridor as far as Helensville, and reaches south to Pukekohe and east to Waiheke Island. In addition, the Plan includes some cross-boundary services that receive financial support.

The Plan includes school bus services that receive Auckland Transport subsidies as part of the urban network, and non-scheduled targeted passenger services such as Total Mobility services. It does not include services provided primarily as tourist services, charter services or school bus services provided by the Ministry of Education.

The Plan describes some existing services that are deemed to be exempt services under the LTMA. Unless specifically identified, the policies and actions in this Plan do not apply to exempt services.

1.4 Consultation and submissions

In developing this Plan, Auckland Transport has consulted with a number of stakeholders including Auckland Council, public transport operators, NZTA, KiwiRail and the Ministry of Education.

A draft Plan was issued in October 2012 and Auckland Transport used the special consultative procedure set out in the Local Government Act 2002 to seek public feedback. More than 700 written submissions were received and a number of submitters presented their views at a series of public hearings held in January and February 2013.

As a result of the public consultation process, a number of changes to the draft Plan were endorsed by the Auckland Transport Board of Directors in March 2013. A further set of amendments to the Plan was prepared following enactment of the LTMA in June 2013; these amendments were subject to further targeted consultation with affected parties, including public transport operators, before being incorporated into this Plan.

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2 Strategic context

This chapter summarises the strategic context within which this Plan has been prepared. It includes a brief overview of the statutory requirements, and the national and regional policy context for public transport. It also discusses the funding expected to be available for public transport in Auckland over the 10 year life of the RPTP.

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2.1 Statutory requirements

The statutory provisions relating to the regulation and management of public transport are contained in Part 5 of the LTMA. The overall purpose of the LTMA is to contribute to an effective, efficient and safe land transport system in the public interest.

Section 115 of the LTMA includes a set of principles that are intended to guide the actions of organisations such as Auckland Transport in undertaking their public transport functions. These principles are:

Part 5 of the LTMA also sets out the statutory requirements for preparing an RPTP. The statutory purpose of the RPTP is to provide:

Section 124 of the LTMA includes a number of matters that Auckland Transport must take into account in preparing its RPTP. In particular, Auckland Transport must be satisfied that the RPTP contributes to the purpose of the LTMA, and that the principles outlined above have been applied. Appendix 3 sets out these matters and provides a summary of how they have been addressed.

Section 120 of the LTMA sets out the mandatory content requirements for the RPTP. These are also detailed in Appendix 3.

2.2 Key strategic drivers

Changes in travel demand

Auckland's increasing population and economic growth are leading to a significant increase in travel demand, with the population expected to grow by approximately 50 per cent over the next 30 years. The transport services and infrastructure required to meet this increasing demand are key influences on future urban design.

When the major roading projects currently under way – such as the Western Ring Route and the Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI) – are completed, almost all of the existing major roading designations will have been utilised. This makes future roading extensions difficult and extremely expensive, and will result in considerable impacts on the built environment.

Uncertainties over future energy supplies, the rising cost of transport fuels and limits to the land available for parking will put further pressure on the transport system. Furthermore, demographic and social changes, such as population ageing, are presenting new challenges that need to be addressed to ensure that future access needs of all Aucklanders, including those with restricted mobility, can be met.

The ability of Auckland's transport system to meet these changes will depend heavily on the ability of the public transport system to significantly increase its share of Auckland's travel demand.

Public transport is far more efficient at moving large numbers of people over longer distances in urban Auckland than is any other travel mode. It also complements investment in the road network by attracting long-distance car travel away from congested motorways and arterial roads, freeing them up for freight and commercial use and other trips that cannot use public transport.

To achieve this, the public transport system needs to be attractive to users, both in terms of the convenience of the service that it offers and the relative cost to users compared to the alternatives available.

The Auckland Plan

The challenges posed by Auckland's projected growth formed the backdrop to the first Auckland Plan, which was released by Auckland Council in May 2012.

The Auckland Plan sets a long-term framework for Auckland's growth and development, and identifies the existing and future locations of critical infrastructure facilities, including transport.

The Auckland Plan's development strategy calls for a significant amount of growth within the rural-urban boundary, with a strong emphasis on centre-based growth. It also identifies a number of priority growth areas where it expects public infrastructure development (including transport) to be focused (see Figure 2-1).

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The Auckland Plan identifies the transport system as crucial to achieving the vision for Auckland to be the world's most liveable city by 2041. The transport system also plays a crucial role in facilitating and supporting national economic growth and productivity.

In particular, the Auckland Plan identifies the need for a transformational shift in public transport and has set a number of challenging targets. These include:

  • Doubling public transport trips from 70 million to 140 million by 2022 (subject to additional funding)

  • Increasing non-car (walking, cycling, and public transport) mode share in the morning peak from 23 to 45 per cent of all trips by 2040

  • Increasing the proportion of trips made by public transport into the city centre during the morning peak from 47 per cent of all vehicular trips in 2011 to 70 per cent by 2040

  • Increasing the number of public transport trips per person per year from 44 to 100 by 2040

  • Increasing the proportion of people living within walking distance of frequent public transport stops from 14 to 32 per cent by 2040.

Achieving these targets will require continued investment in frequent public transport networks that support the intensification of centres, corridors and future urban areas. As part of this, the Auckland Plan identifies the City Rail Link as the major transport priority for Auckland.

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Map:

Figure 2-1: Auckland Plan development strategy

Transcriber's Note: The map shows projected urban development across the Auckland region including level of change to a given area, centre type, land use, transport routes, land type and selected transport facilities. Map key follows. End Note.

Urban development: Most change; Significant change; Moderate change; Some change; Least change

Metropolitan centre; Town centre (varying degrees of change); Emergent centre; Satellite town; Rural and coastal town; Major business areas

Future urban business areas (pipeline); Future urban residential areas (operative); Future residential areas (pipeline); Greenfield areas for investigation

Two big initiatives: City Centre & Fringe/The Southern Initiative

Ferry routes; Existing rail network; Proposed rail network; Strategic road network; Arterial roads; Rapid transit Network (RTN); Baseline 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit

Bush living; Country living; Mixed rural production; Major public open space; Rural coastal; Rural island; Rural production; Defence land

Port; International airport; Area subject to the Eastern Access Agreement including Pūkai Marae AC and AIAL

The map should be read in conjunction with the relevant text in the Auckland Plan development strategy and supporting chapters.

End Map.

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Other strategic influences

In addition to the Auckland Plan, Auckland Transport considered a number of other strategies, plans and policies when preparing this Plan. The policy implications of these other documents are summarised in Table 2-1 below and further details are provided in Appendix 4.

Table:

Table 2-1: Policy implications of other influencing documents

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Document; Policy implications. End Note.

Integrated Transport Programme (ITP)

Coordinates, prioritises and sequences transport investments over the next 30 years to give effect to the Auckland Plan. Includes a four-stage intervention process for prioritisation. Emphasises the need to maximise the use of current facilities and assets, and to establish a more connective network.

Government Policy Statement on land transport funding

Highlights the Government's focus areas of economic growth and productivity, value for money and road safety. Focuses on the need for public transport to deliver value for money, provide access to economic opportunities, help relieve congestion and provide better transport choices.

Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM)

Provides a new approach to planning, procurement and the development of public transport using a partnership approach between purchasers and providers. This has implications for the way in which services are planned and procured.

NZTA farebox recovery policy

Seeks to improve value for money by increasing the proportion of operating costs recovered from user fares. Requires this Plan to include farebox recovery policy and targets.

Regional Land Transport Strategy (RLTS)

The RLTS was adopted by the former Auckland Regional Council in April 2010. It focuses on the development of strong public transport links between growth centres and the need for an integrated hierarchy of services to support this. It also includes number of policies that influence the quality and level of service. Following the recent amendment to the LTMA, the RLTS will no longer be required and Auckland Transport will, in future, be required to prepare a Regional Land Transport Plan. However, as this RPTP is being adopted prior to 3 June 2015, when the new Regional Land Transport Plan must be in place, Section 15 (2) of the LTMA requires that Auckland Transport take the public transport components of the RLTS into account in preparing this RPTP. A summary of how this has been done is shown in Appendix 4.

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Unitary Plan

The RPTP is required to take into account any regional policy statement, regional plan or district plan prepared under the Resource Management Act 1991. These plans contain a range of policies that encourage mutually supportive land use and public transport provision, which is reflected in this RPTP also. Auckland Council is currently preparing the Unitary Plan, which will guide Auckland's future land-use development through the application of policies and rules for development. This RPTP contains policies that promote the alignment of land-use development with public transport services.

Other Auckland Council plans

Auckland Council and its council-controlled organisations have prepared other plans and policies that will impact the provision of public transport services and infrastructure in specific parts of the region. These include the Central City Master Plan and the Waterfront Plan.

New Zealand Energy-Efficiency and Conservation Strategy

The New Zealand Energy-Efficiency and Conservation Strategy provides an action plan for energy efficiency and conservation, and the use of renewable sources of energy. This strategy sets an objective of a more energy-efficient transport system, with a greater diversity of fuels and alternative energy technologies.

End Table.

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2.3 Public transport funding

In preparing the RPTP, Auckland Transport is required to take account of the public transport funding likely to be available within the region.

The two main funding sources are subsidies from the NZTA and local contributions. Local contributions consist of revenue (other than farebox revenue) and the contribution set out in Auckland Council's long-term plan as part of the funding for Auckland Transport's activities.

Available funding

The 2012/15 Auckland Regional Land Transport Programme includes an indicative allocation of $7,081m to public transport services and infrastructure over the next 10 years, as shown in Table 2-2 below.

This includes $3,483m for services (including SuperGold card reimbursement and electric train financing costs) and $3,598m for public transport infrastructure (with approximately 80 per cent allocated to the City Rail Link).

Of the $946m in public transport services expenditure identified for years 1 to 3 of the programme, Auckland Transport has requested $500m, or 53 per cent, from NZTA. An additional $78m has been requested for infrastructure projects.

Table:

Table 2-2: 2012–2015 Regional Land Transport Programme indicative allocations to public transport ($000) (See Footnote 1)

Funding category

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Total years 1 to 3

Years 4 to 10

10-Year total

Public Transport services (includes SuperGold card)

286,840

305,146

288,710

880,696

2,274,459

3,155,155

Electric train financing

18,541

19,996

26,967

65,504

261,962

327,466

Total services

305,381

325,142

315,677

946,200

2,536,421

3,482,621

City Rail Link

110,495

180,865

169,774

461,134

2,400,922

2,862,056

Other Public Transport infrastructure

137,973

213,170

202,001

553,144

183,240

736,384

Total infrastructure

248,468

394,035

371,775

1,014,278

2,584,162

3,598,440

Total public transport

553,849

719,177

687,452

1,960,478

5,120,583

7,081,061

Footnote 1: The indicative allocations in the Regional Land Transport Programme include Auckland Transport's requests for funding from the contestable National Land Transport Fund and other items (notably the City Rail Link) for which NLTF funding is not sought. The indicative allocations for years 1 to 3 have a greater level of funding certainty than do those for years 4 to 10. End Footnote.

End Table.

NZTA seeks value for money from investing National Land Transport Programme funds via approved organisations. Its objective for public transport funding is to achieve better value for money from public transport services and infrastructure by seeking to maintain or grow patronage, particularly where it reduces congestion and supports economic growth and productivity, with the same or fewer resources.

Although additional NZTA funds will be available for the operating costs associated with current commitments to integrated ticketing and rail system improvements, the level of funding available in the short to medium term is expected to be similar to current levels. This means that funding for new initiatives will be limited.

NZTA has indicated that it expects organisations such as Auckland Transport to manage their public transport services and operations within their three-year funding allocation from the National Land Transport Programme, with no additional top-ups for cost escalation or indexation for inflation. In addition, the national farebox recovery policy requires regions to develop and implement their own farebox recovery policies to ensure that users contribute a reasonable proportion of public transport costs through fare payments.

These limitations mean that a major focus for the next decade will be enhancing network performance and achieving better value from existing investments. To achieve this, the following combination of responses is included in this Plan:

  • Changes to the network structure in order to deliver improved service levels and higher patronage within the existing level of operating resources

  • More-efficient service procurement arrangements through PTOM to deliver better value for money

  • Increased user contributions through higher farebox recovery.

Page 27

Future investment

The Auckland Plan proposes further major investment in the transport system over the next 30 years to support the growth of the city and to achieve transport outcomes and targets consistent with its vision.

Implementation of the transport aspects of the Auckland Plan will be done through the Integrated Transport Programme (ITP), which will be continuously updated. See Appendix 4 for more details.

The ITP has assessed the 30-year transport investment required to implement the Auckland Plan, and has adopted a four-stage intervention process to establish investment priorities.

In the first decade of the 30-year period, the intention is to build on the investments made over the last decade by completing the strategic road and public transport networks. Many of these investments, such as the rail network electrification, are already under way. When complete, these investments will provide improved service performance, which will, in turn, support economic development and productivity, and the liveability of the city.

Further major investments will be needed in the second decade to maintain this momentum. The priority investment for this decade is the City Rail Link, which will provide a dramatic increase in the capacity and effectiveness of the public transport system. The City Rail Link will result in a more cost-effective use of the whole rail network by removing the bottleneck at its centre (Britomart), in the same way that investments in the motorway network have progressively removed bottlenecks and increased the efficiency of the state highway network. As noted in the Auckland Plan, additional funding sources will be needed so that the City Rail Link can be completed.

Although the proposed investments will increase the whole-of-life costs of operating, maintaining and renewing the network, they will enable far more people to travel through the system safely and efficiently. By prioritising and sequencing the investment with land-use development and travel demand growth, it should be possible to deliver improved system performance and productivity, and lower unit costs over the longer term, as shown below:

Graph:

Figure 2-2: Auckland 30-year transport investment, productivity and unit costs

Transcriber's Note: The line graph data are summarised below.

y-axis: Patronage and Investment (no scale)

x-axis: Time (2012 shown approximately one third of the way along the graph)

Graph key: Patronage; Operating costs/passenger; Infrastructure investment and management to cope with growth

Patronage is shown to shown to start low and track upward in a gentle s-shaped curve.

Operating costs/passenger is shown to start at a medium level, rise gently until after 2012 and then drop off into a gradual downward trend.

Infrastructure Investment is shown to start low and increase rapidly until after 2012, where it dips, then levels off into a gradual upward trend.

End Graph.

Page 28

3 Our current public transport system

This chapter summarises the current types of public transport services, recent investments and developments and the ensuing benefits. It also outlines the challenges that remain and proposed responses.

Page 29

3.1 Current system

The current public transport network serves the Auckland metropolitan area along with some services to outlying centres such as Helensville and Beachlands. Services are provided by trains, buses, ferries and small passenger vehicles and taxis for the Total Mobility services. Service levels vary by route, by day of the week and by time of day, in response to changing demand.

The current services are described in Appendix 2. The network core consists of the services operating on dedicated rights of way, free of traffic congestion – the rail network and the Northern Busway. These are supported by bus services on major arterial roads, which generally operate at a high level of service, and local routes that are less frequent. Ferry services operate between coastal areas and the city centre.

Many current services operate on a radial pattern between the suburbs and the city centre. Crosstown services include the three LINK bus services that follow loop routes within the city centre and the inner suburbs.

3.2 Recent developments

Over recent years, improvements to Auckland's public transport services have focused on creating higher-frequency services and improved local networks. This has included significant investment in the rail network and the Northern Busway, which form Auckland's rapid transit network.

This investment has been supported by a range of improvements to both the quality and frequency of bus and ferry services, especially on major routes.

Current projects, including rail electrification, new electric trains and integrated ticketing will provide the foundation for a completely integrated network in the future.

The table below highlights developments in progress or completed since the 2010 RPTP.

Table:

Table 3-1: Public transport developments since 2010

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. End Note.

Rail

  • Western Line double-tracking; Onehunga Line reopened; Manukau Spur completed

  • Manukau and Onehunga Stations completed; Parnell Station started

  • New Lynn trench and bus/train interchange completed, with transit-oriented development underway. Panmure Interchange underway.

  • New Electric Multiple Units(EMU) depot complete and contract for electric trains let and underway

  • Electrification and signalling improvements progressing across network with 2014 target completion

  • Ongoing programme of station upgrades to accommodate longer trains and enhance customer amenities underway

  • Real-time information upgrades and rollout continuing

  • Implementation of integrated ticketing well underway

Bus

  • Ongoing programme of corridor, infrastructure and service reviews to improve operations

  • LINK and Western Bays network changes implemented

  • Real-time information upgrades and rollout continuing; Launch of mobile and Internet-based applications for bus departure times at all stops

  • Expansion of Albany Busway Park-and-Ride complete

  • Implementation of integrated ticketing well underway

Ferry

  • Terminals for Hobsonville Point and Beach Haven complete, with new services running from 2013; Stanley Bay terminal upgrade completed

  • Birkenhead Ferry Terminal berthing improvements completed

  • Planning and investigations for the Half Moon Bay and Bayswater Ferry Terminal upgrades undertaken

  • Downtown Ferry Terminal upgrade and improvements ongoing

  • Implementation of integrated ticketing well underway

End Table.

Page 30

The recent investment in public transport infrastructure and services to date has resulted in significant growth in patronage, with 71.1 million public transport boardings in the year to June 2012.

Auckland's historic pattern of public transport patronage shows that total patronage has more than doubled since a low point in the early 1990s, and has increased by 35 per cent in the last five years. Figure 3-1 below shows that total patronage is now at its highest level since the late 1950s.

All modes have shown growth, with rail patronage being particularly strong in recent years. Since the Britomart Transport Centre opened in 2003, rail boardings have increased sharply from 2.5 million to 10.9 million in 2012. Bus patronage has also increased significantly in recent years.

Graph:

Figure 3-1: Annual Auckland public transport boardings (millions), 1920–2012

Transcriber's Note:

The histogram graph data have been summarised in a table below. All data are approximate and have been rounded to the nearest 5 million.

End Note.

blank

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

Tram

65

70

70

105

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

Bus

No visible data

10

15

20

60

45

60

55

40

70

Trolley bus

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

10

30

20

5

No visible data

No visible data

No visible data

Train

10

10

10

10

5

5

5

0

5

15

Ferry

5

5

5

10

5

0

0

0

5

5

End Graph.

3.3 Issues and challenges

Despite these successes, Auckland's public transport system still has shortcomings. The existing network of bus routes is complex, with around 400 different route numbers employed. Many of these routes are infrequent, long and indirect. This results in customer confusion and duplicated resources. Public transport in Auckland can be particularly hard to understand for visitors to the city and occasional users of the system. When compared to car travel, many public transport trips are slow due to long waits for connections to other modes and routes and between services, and slow boarding and travel times.

Looking to the future, Auckland's continued growth also presents a number of challenges for the public transport system. The major challenges, and Auckland Transport's proposed responses, are outlined below.

Pages 31–33

Table:

Table 3 2: Major challenges and proposed responses

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. Table headings were: Challenge; Current situation; Proposed response. End Note.

Achieving a transformational shift

Current situation: The absence of an integrated and connected multi-modal network means that mode specific patronage gains, especially with a city centre focus, are insufficient to achieve the major shift to public transport use across Auckland at the scale needed to achieve Auckland Plan targets.

Proposed response: The new service network structure identified in this Plan expands the coverage of high-frequency services. These will enable more people to access more destinations throughout the day, including metropolitan and town centres, in addition to the city centre. The integrated network will be supported by integrated ticketing and fares, greatly improving the ease of access to a wider range of key destinations.

Integration with land-use changes

Current situation: The current system is only partially aligned with land-use changes, with greenfield initiatives being a particular weakness. Until recently, development was not influenced significantly by the presence of good public transport access. There are signs that this is changing with the ongoing investments in high-quality, permanent, public transport infrastructure and services.

Proposed response: The new service network will provide a permanent connective grid of frequent services. This will provide certainty for land-use intensification. This Plan also enables service extensions to be planned together with greenfield developments.

Meeting diverse travel demands

Current situation: Auckland's travel patterns reflect a diverse pattern of movements from many origins to many destinations; this is difficult to service with a traditional, radial, public transport network. There is a limited customer base for many of the current peak and point-to-point focused services.

Proposed response: The new network will provide better integration of bus, rail and ferry services. This will enable them to work together to offer a wider range of destinations without compromising service coverage. In particular, the frequent 'all-day' service network will be greatly expanded to offer improved mobility to more destinations.

Funding constraints

Current situation: Public transport funding is becoming more constrained as the Government strives to obtain better value for money from its current spending, while the economic situation demands restraint.

In the medium term, significant additional investment will be required to achieve the patronage targets set in the Auckland Plan. This will require new funding sources to be identified.

Proposed response: The need to make more-effective use of existing financial resources is a key driver of the policies in this Plan, including the new service network proposals. This has resulted in proposals that shift resources away from currently over lapping radial and point-to-point routes, to a stronger focus on newly emerging areas of demand and a connected service network. More efficient procurement arrangements will improve value for money also.

Farebox recovery

Current situation: NZTA has set a national farebox recovery target of 50 per cent. The current Farebox Recovery Ratio in Auckland is approximately 44 per cent. Improving this ratio towards the national target will require a combination of increases in fare revenues (from increased passenger numbers and fare adjustments) and reductions in operating costs (see Appendix 6 for more details).

Proposed response: The new service network proposals outlined in this Plan are expected to result in better utilisation of resources, and increased patronage and fare revenues through a service pattern that is better aligned to meet future demands. The farebox recovery policy also provides for regular annual fare reviews, to ensure that fare levels keep pace with changes in operating costs. The rail electrification and implementation of the PTOM should also deliver operational efficiencies as well.

Meeting the needs of the transport disadvantaged

Current situation: Appendix 7 describes the access needs of the transport-disadvantaged. The current public transport system caters to these needs through bus routes that connect to key activity centres, specialised services such as Total Mobility, accessible vehicles and concessionary fares to target groups.

Proposed response: The new network design places stronger emphasis on providing access to key activity centres, with the rapid and frequent service network allowing additional connections to other centres and the city centre. This Plan also provides for the continuation of concession fares, specialised services such as Total Mobility and community transport services in areas where scheduled bus services are not cost effective.

Integrating services and infrastructure

Current situation: Successful implementation of the new public transport network will require development of supporting infrastructure to provide safe and convenient interchanges between services. It is important that these facilities, and the services they support, are planned and implemented in a coordinated manner.

Proposed response: The new service network design identifies locations where new infrastructure is needed. This Plan includes policies that will facilitate the integrated planning and development of services and infrastructure, to ensure that the passenger experience is as safe, convenient and seamless as possible. As a single agency responsible for service and infrastructure delivery, Auckland Transport can ensure integration to greater extent than has been possible in the past.

Uncompetitive travel times

Current situation: For most trips, public transport (particularly bus travel) is far slower than is driving due to a combination of low-frequency services (with associated waiting times), slow boarding times, and stop-start travel. Achieving a major mode shift requires actions to reduce travel time on public transport, making it more competitive with car travel.

Proposed response: This Plan includes a range of initiatives that will help to make public transport travel time more competitive. These include Auckland Integrated Fare System (AIFS) card implementation to reduce boarding times, electrification to speed up the rail system, development of a rapid and frequent service network to reduce waiting and connection times, improved pedestrian access to train stations or from Park-and-Ride facilities, and bus priorities to reduce bus travel times (as discussed below).

Impact of congestion on bus operations

Current Situation: As traffic volumes grow, the ability of the public transport system to offer an attractive alternative to private-vehicle travel can be compromised when services are affected by traffic congestion. This increases bus travel times, reduces reliability and makes connections between services difficult to achieve. It also adds to the resources needed to operate the service.

Proposed response: This Plan highlights the need to develop a clear policy framework for bus-priority measures, and when and where these will be necessary to ensure are liable and efficient bus service. This will be particularly important to help achieve the reliable connections needed for the success of the new network design.

Serving areas of low demand

Current Situation: The cost-effective provision of transport services to areas of low demand is a common challenge for public transport providers and funders. Services to rural communities are currently very limited. Within urban Auckland, the timely provision of services to newly developing residential areas is also a challenge.

Proposed response: The new service network design is intended to provide flexibility to enable expansion into newly developing areas when appropriate. By initially connecting these growth areas into key activity centres and/or by providing Park-and-Ride opportunities, access to a wider range of destinations will be provided via the rapid and frequent service network. This Plan also provides for community transport services in areas where scheduled bus services are not cost effective.

Improving energy efficiency

Current Situation: Public transport offers the potential for a more energy-efficient transport system, by carrying more people in fewer vehicles. However, the public transport system itself needs to be as energy efficient as possible.

Proposed response: The Plan provides for a change to the network that is designed to deliver more trips within the existing level of resources, which will deliver energy efficiencies. Vehicle-quality policies provide for newer, cleaner, well-patronised diesel buses and electric trains, and the investigation of alternative fuel technologies for buses.

End Table.

Page 34

4 What we want to achieve

This chapter sets out the future vision for public transport in Auckland, together with supporting outcomes and objectives. It also sets out measures and targets that we can use to track our progress.

Pages 35–36

Vision

An integrated, efficient and effective public transport network that caters for a wider range of trips and is valued by Aucklanders.

Outcomes

To achieve this vision, Auckland's public transport system needs to deliver:

  • Services that align with future land-use patterns

  • Services that meet customer needs

  • Increased passenger numbers

  • Increased public transport mode share

  • Improved value for money.

Measures and targets

Auckland Transport has identified a series of measures that will help to measure our progress towards achieving these outcomes. Key measures are outlined below, with an indication of current performance, and future projected targets that reflect both the Auckland Plan targets and those considered achievable over the next 10 years within current funding provision. They will be supported by more-detailed performance indicators, which are described in the monitoring policies in Section 6.10.

Table:

Table 4 1: Key outcomes and measurements

Outcome

Measure

Current performance

Auckland Plan Target

Funded Target 2022 (See Footnote 2)

Services that align with Auckland's future land-use pattern

Percentage of households within 500 metres' walk of the rapid and frequent service network

14%

32% (2040)

40%

Services that meet customer needs (a)

Percentage of households within 500 metres' walk of a public transport stop

Approximately 80% in urban area

n.a.

90%

Services that meet customer needs (b)

Percentage of customers satisfied with their public transport service

87% TBA

n.a.; 140.0

>90%; 103.0

Increased passenger numbers (a)

Total passenger boardings per annum

69.1 million

140 million (2022)

103 million

Increased passenger numbers (b)

Annual passenger boardings per capita

48.7 (urban area)

100 (2040); 100.00

57; 57.00

Increased public transport mode share

Percentage of peak-period trips to central city made by public transport

47%

70% (2040)

55%

Improved value for money (a)

Farebox Recovery Ratio

45%

n.a.

50%

Improved value for money (b)

Operating subsidy per passenger kilometre

$0.27

n.a.

$0.25; (CPI adjusted)

Footnote 2: The 'funded target 2022' shows the target level of performance that Auckland Transport aims to achieve by 2022 with the level of public transport funding expected to be available over the next 10 years, as outlined in Section 2.3. These may differ from the Auckland Plan targets, which are generally longer term (2040). End Footnote.

End Table.

Page 37

Achieving future targets is contingent on realising assumed land-use growth patterns, sufficient investment in public transport over the period and the positive response of the general public to service proposals.

Objectives

To help deliver the vision and associated outcomes, Auckland Transport has developed the following objectives for Auckland's public transport system:

1. A permanent network of connected frequent services that supports Auckland's future growth

2. Simple, integrated services that connect people with where they want to go

3. A high standard of public transport infrastructure that supports service provision and enhances the customer experience

4. A convenient and reliable public transport system using modern vehicles

5. A fares and ticketing system that attracts and retains customers, while balancing user contributions against public funding

6. Simple, visible and intuitive customer information and service

7. Improved access for communities and groups whose needs are not met by the regular public transport system

8. A procurement system that supports the efficient delivery of public transport services

9. Effective and efficient allocation of public transport funding

10. A system of monitoring and review that supports continuous improvement.

These are discussed in more detail in Chapter 6, together with supporting policies and actions

Page 38

5 Key directions

This chapter sets out the key directions that this Plan is taking to achieve its objectives, and provides an overview of the new network concept.

Pages 39–40

The Auckland Plan has set a number of challenging targets for public transport. It recognises that the ability of Auckland's transport system to meet the future growth in travel demand will depend on further investment in the public transport system to improve its capacity and service levels.

To achieve this, Auckland Transport proposes to implement a range of improvements to services and supporting infrastructure. These improvements aim to retain and grow the existing customer base, and attract new customers to public transport.

The planning horizon for the RPTP is up to 10 years. The approach taken towards network planning in this Plan has been to:

This approach builds on the momentum being delivered by recent system improvements and others that are currently being delivered, including rail electrification, the new electric rail units, and integrated ticketing. The challenge is to do this in a way that better meets customer demands while making best use of our limited transport resources.

The approach outlined in this Plan responds to this challenge by setting out a refined, integrated network structure for Auckland's public transport system which allows improved levels of service through better utilisation of the current level of operating resources. This will deliver more frequent and reliable services and more travel choices in a cost-effective manner. It will also support Auckland's future growth by providing a permanent network of frequent services and infrastructure that will give greater certainty for land-use development decisions.

When the timing of the City Rail Link is more certain, further changes to the supporting public transport system will probably be needed. These will be reflected in future versions of this Plan.

The table below shows the expected transition towards the mature public transport system that will be in place by 2022.

Table:

Table 5-1: Anticipated changes in the public transport network

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. Table headings were: Current (2013); Transitional (by 2016); Mature (by 2022). End Note.

Route structure

Current (2013): Complex system of about 40 routes with emphasis on point-to-point and peak services

Transitional (by 2016): Implementation of a simpler, more connective network of about 130 routes before the City Rail Link

Mature (by 2022): Completion of simpler, more connective network based on high-frequency services maximised by the operational City Rail Link

Access to key destinations

Current (2013): Radial route structure provides good access to city centre but access to other key destinations is patchy

Transitional (by 2016): Good access to city centre retained but connected network offers easier access to a wide range of additional destinations, and facilitates crosstown travel

Mature (by 2022): Connected network and enhanced capacity from City Rail Link offers very good access to city centre and easier access to a wide range of additional destinations, and facilitates crosstown travel

Service procurement and delivery

Current (2013): Begin negotiating alignment with operator contracts through the PTOM

Transitional (by 2016): Let progressive PTOM contracts for all public transport services to implement the connected service network

Mature (by 2022): Continued service procurement and management through the PTOM performance-based contracts

Integrated tickets/fares

Current (2013): Integrated ticket implementation (AT HOP branded)

Transitional (by 2016): Develop and finalise the appropriate integrated fare system without transfer penalties

Mature (by 2022): Integrated ticket and fare system allows seamless passenger transfers between operators and modes without transfer penalties

Enabling infrastructure

Current (2013): Identify and programme infrastructure requirements

Transitional (by 2016): Investment in infrastructure and customer facilities upgrades, especially on the rapid and frequent service network

Mature (by 2022): Completed infrastructure and customer facilities allow seamless passenger connections between services, and reliable and cost efficient operation of services

Reliability and service performance

Current (2013): Route structure impacts reliable service delivery; Timetable run-time update to reflect the operating environment; GPS tracking option to performance-manage services under development

Transitional (by 2016): Simpler, connected service structure improves reliability; High frequency services reduce waiting time; Interactive customer use of real time tracking service information; PTOM contracts performance manage service delivery, and GPS tracking provides continuous improvement; Consistent system branding and presentation

Mature (by 2022): Continuous improvement through PTOM contract performance management

Customer information

Current (2013): Complex route structure results in complex information; Limited early use of GPS tracking system to provide real-time information

Transitional (by 2016): Simple and intuitive public transport information and network-wide way-finding; Intuitive and customer interactive use of GPS service tracking real-time information

Mature (by 2022): Continued improvement through technology where possible

Electric rail fleet

Current (2013): Procurement of new train fleet completed and design underway; Network electrification underway

Transitional (by 2016): New train fleet implemented and operational

Mature (by 2022): City Rail Link provides an expanded rail network and optimum use of the rail network

City Rail Link

Current (2013): Route protection underway

Transitional (by 2016): Land purchase and detailed design

Mature (by 2022): City Rail Link is operational, expanding system capacity and improving access by public transport

End Table.

The new service network structure will be built around a core network of rapid and frequent services. These include the existing rapid transit services on rail and the Northern Busway, supplemented by a number of high-frequency bus routes connecting major centres. The rapid and frequent service network will deliver at least a 15-minute service operating all day (initially from 7am to 7pm with reduced frequencies outside those hours). It will be complemented by a network of connector routes that operate all-day services every half-hour. In addition, a supporting network of local, peak-only, and targeted services will cater to specific market needs. The new network structure is shown below:

Page 41

Diagram:

Figure 5-1: New network: service categories

Transcriber's Note: The diagram text is listed below. End Note.

Service layers:

Rapid

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 15 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Dedicated Right of Way

Frequent

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 15 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Priority measures required

Connector

Defining features: All Day Network

Minimum Frequency: 30 minutes

Operating Hours: 7am–7pm, lower frequencies outside these hours

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Priority measures required

Local, Peak-Only and Targeted

Defining features: Supporting Network

Minimum Frequency: Driven by demand

Operating Hours: Driven by demand

Achieving Speed & Reliability: Limited priority measures

End Diagram.

The main change from the current network pattern will be the much stronger focus on integration between services. This requires an equally strong focus on the development of convenient interchange facilities, high frequency services and a simple integrated fare system.

Although some passengers will need to transfer between services to complete a particular trip, the impact will be minimised by the provision of good interchange facilities, integrated ticketing and fares, and improved frequencies. An additional benefit results from access to a much wider set of destinations.

Figure 5-2 shows a conceptual map of rapid and frequent services highlighting the advantages of a connective network providing all-day accessibility across many destinations in the region.

Figure 5-3 shows its planned geographic spread after the initial implementation is completed by 2016, while Figure 5-4 shows the proposed core network in 2022, which includes the changes that will be made to support the City Rail Link.

In the longer term, further extensions to the rapid and frequent service network are likely to accommodate Auckland's growth. For example, the extension of the rapid transit network to connect to Auckland Airport is currently under investigation. Once confirmed, such network extensions will be incorporated into this Plan through a variation.

The rapid and frequent service network will be supported by connector services operating at 30-minute intervals. This combination of rapid, frequent and connector services will form the all-day network, which will provide good coverage throughout the urban area. The proposed coverage of the all-day network in 2016 is shown in Figure 5-5, while Figure 5-6 shows it in 2022, following completion of the City Rail Link.

It is important to note that Figures 5-2 to 5-6 do not show all of the services that will be available in the future. In addition to the rapid, frequent and connector services illustrated in the maps, a supporting network of local, peak-only and targeted services will be available (including services in the outer parts of the region that are not covered by the maps in Figures 5-2 to 5-6). These services are described in Appendix 1 (See Footnote 3), and details of regional services proposed in the outer parts of the region are shown in Figure 5.7.

Footnote 3: Maps of proposed local, peak-only and targeted services will be prepared as part of the local consultation process, and finalised once that process has been completed and the routes confirmed. End Footnote.

Some of the services shown in Figures 5-2 to 5-6 and described in Appendix 1 are existing services that are deemed to be exempt services under Section 153 (2) of the LTMA. These include the Airbus service, and ferry services to Devonport, Stanley Bay and Waiheke. These services are integral to the regional public transport network, as they provide important public transport connections within the urban area and are integrated with other services in the network. As exempt services, however, they are not provided under contract with Auckland Transport.

Should any of these deemed exempt services cease to be operated by the relevant public transport operator, the relevant service will be deregistered with effect on and from one day following the date that the relevant public transport operator ceases to operate it. The relevant route description of the deemed exempt service will then become a unit for the

Page 42

purposes of the LTMA. Unless specifically identified, the policies and procedures in Chapter 6 do not apply to exempt services.

In addition to the new services described in this Plan, improvements to the connectivity of walking and cycling networks with proposed public transport interchanges and stops are essential to improve access to the proposed simplified public transport network. These improvements would extend opportunities to benefit from the improved public transport services as part of a wider 'whole journey' approach.

The future role of ferry services within the new network is in need of further review. Until now, ferry services have been provided through a mix of commercial and contracted services, and their fare structures have differed from those offered on bus and rail. Given the Auckland maritime environment, the potential for ferries to play a greater role in the public transport system is recognised, but this needs to be carried out in a way that integrates with the rest of the network, while acknowledging the specific characteristics of Auckland's ferry market (including a strong tourism component, and the fact that some ferry services, as noted above, are deemed to be exempt services under the LTMA). The review outlined in this Plan will consider options for achieving greater integration, potential new ferry connections and supporting feeder services.

The policies and actions set out in the next chapter have been designed to give effect to the new network structure. They are also designed to address the challenges that are inherent with the implementation of the new network, especially in relation to the need for interchange between services. In this regard, the policies associated with infrastructure and integrated fares will be particularly important in the successful implementation of the new system.

Map:

Figure 5-2: Metro-style conceptual map of a rapid and frequent service network

Transcriber's Note: The map encompasses the Auckland region from Albany (to Silverdale) in the north, Howick in the east, Papakura (to Pukekohe) in the south and Swanson in the west. There is no key present. End Map.

Page 43

Map:

Figure 5-3: Proposed rapid and frequent service network, 2016

Transcriber's Note: The map encompasses Northcross in the north, Howick in the east, Papakura in the south and Swanson in the west.

Major Interchanges (in alphabetical order):

  • Akoranga

  • Britomart

  • Henderson

  • Manukau

  • New Lynn

  • Newmarket

  • Onehunga

  • Panmure

  • Takapuna

  • University

  • Wynyard

Map key follows. End Note.

Major Interchange; Intermediate Interchange; Minor Interchange; Station or Locality; Ferry Wharf

End Map.

Page 44

Map:

Figure 5-4: Proposed rapid and frequent service network, 2022

Transcriber's Note: The scope and key of the map match Figure 5-3. There are two additional Major Interchanges: Aotea; Newton.

End Map.

Page 45

Map:

Figure 5-5: Proposed all-day service network, 2016

Transcriber's Note: The map encompasses Albany (to Orewa and Whangaparoa) in the north, Howick in the east, Papakura (to Pukekohe) in the south, Swanson in the west and Westgate (to Huapai, Waimaku and Helensville) in the northwest. Major interchanges: See Figure 5-3. Map key follows. End Note.

Rapid Network; Frequent Network; Connector Network; Major Interchange; Intermediate Interchange; Minor Interchange; Station or Locality; Ferry Wharf.

Note: map does not show proposed local peak-only and targeted services.

End Map.

Page 45

Map:

Figure 5-6: Proposed all-day service network, 2022

Transcriber's Note: The scope and key of the map match Figure 5-5. Major interchanges: See Figure 5-4. End Note.

Note: map does not show proposed local peak-only and targeted services.

End Map.

Page 46

Maps:

Figure 5-7: Proposed regional services

Transcriber's Note: A full list of interchanges and stations follows.

Map 1: North Regional Services:

  • Gulf Harbour

  • Manly

  • Silverdale

  • Waiwera

  • Warkworth

Map 2: West Regional Services:

  • Helensville

  • Henderson

  • Huapai

  • Swanson

  • Waimaku

  • Waitakere Village

  • Westgate

  • Whenuapai

Map 3: East Regional Services:

  • Maraetai

  • Matiatia Wharf

  • Pine Harbour

Map 4: South Regional Services:

  • Drury

  • Papakura

  • Pukekohe

  • Waiuku

A key to the maps follows. End Note.

Rapid Network; Connector Network; Local Network; Major Interchange; Intermediate Interchange; Minor Interchange; Station or Locality.

End Maps.

Page 48

6 Policies and actions

This chapter sets out the policies that apply to public transport services in the Auckland region, and the actions that Auckland Transport proposes to take to implement those policies.

Page 49

The vision and outcomes in Chapter 4 describe the longer-term direction for public transport in Auckland, and what it aims to deliver. This chapter sets out the policies that will be followed in order to progress towards this longer-term vision and these outcomes. It also describes the actions that Auckland Transport intends to take to implement those policies.

Ten policy areas are outlined in the following sections:

6.1 Network structure

6.2 Integrated service network

6.3 Infrastructure

6.4 Service quality

6.5 Fares and ticketing

6.6 Customer interface

6.7 Assisting the transport-disadvantaged

6.8 Procurement and exempt services

6.9 Funding and prioritisation

6.10 Monitoring and review.

Each section has the following format:

Implementation of the policies and actions depends on whether funding is available.

Auckland Transport's expectation is that the objectives, policies and actions in this chapter are reflected in the provisions of PTOM unit contracts with public transport operators. In particular, the following policies and actions apply to units:

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The Table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policy no.; Subject. End Note.

2.7 Minimum levels of service (frequency and hours of operation)

2.8 (a) Adjustments to levels of service

3.3 (a) Use of infrastructure and access agreements

4.3 Reliability and punctuality standards, monitoring and driver training

4.4 Vehicle and vessel standards

4.5 Performance-based contracts

4.6 Information required to monitor service performance

5.1 Integrated fares and ticketing system

5.2 Participation in integrated fares and ticketing

5.5 Setting and reviewing fares

5.7 Concession fares

5.9 (b) Revenue protection and inspection

6.2 (b) Branding on vehicles and vessels

6.6 Customer service and quality

7.1 (c) Services to be operated with accessible vehicles

8.1 Establishment of units and PTOM framework

8.2 Service continuity provisions

8.4 PTOM agreements and partnership approach

8.5 Rail units

8.6 Transition to PTOM contracts

10.1 Unit performance monitoring

10.2 Service reviews

End Table.

In addition, Policy 7.2 applies to taxi and shuttle services for which Auckland Transport intends to provide financial assistance.

Unless specifically identified, the policies and actions outlined in this chapter do not apply to exempt services.

Page 50

6.1 Network structure

Objective 1: A permanent network of connected frequent services that supports Auckland's future growth

Auckland Transport proposes to use an improved approach to public transport provision, based on a simplified route structure. The core of the new system will be an integrated network of high-frequency, all-day services that will provide connections between key locations, including the city centre, metropolitan centres and major town centres. By providing strong and permanent links between growth centres, the rapid and frequent service network and its supporting infrastructure will support intensification and development at key locations. This, in turn, will provide certainty for developers, investors, businesses and residents.

The core rapid and frequent service network will provide services at least every 15 minutes throughout the day. It will consist of the existing rapid services (rail and busway) that operate on their own rights of way, plus an extensive network of high-frequency bus routes which will provide connections between key activity centres, and to and from the city centre. The proposed rapid and frequent service network in 2016 is shown in Figure 5-2 and Figure 5-3.

The target operating period for the rapid and frequent service network is between 6am and 9pm, seven days a week (with lower frequencies outside these times). This will be phased in, depending on funding and demand. The initial target for the all-day rapid and frequent services is 7am to 7pm, seven days a week, by 2016, with future extensions of the time span subject to resources and service demand.

The rapid and frequent service network will be complemented by a range of other services, as outlined in Section 6.2. These include a network of connector services, with bus services operating at least every 30 minutes throughout the same operating period as that of the rapid and frequent service network. The proposed connector services in 2016 are shown in Figure 5-5. As demand grows over time, the aim is to have some of these services become part of the frequent service network.

A core network that is permanent provides significant longer-term benefits for Auckland, notably:

  • Efficient use of infrastructure, as it is used more intensively throughout the day

  • Support for land-use intensification along key corridors and centres as people choose to be close to the rapid and frequent services. As the frequent services tend to operate on regional arterials, decongestion benefits are likely to result on these roads.

  • A virtuous circle is created, whereby quality public transport supports land-use intensification, which in turn supports further increases in service frequency and hours of operation as demand grows over time.

Investing in this type of network is expected to achieve better value-for money outcomes for Auckland Transport and its funders.

Page 51

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

1.1 Provide a core network of frequent and reliable services

Plan and procure services on the rapid and frequent service network (Figure 5-2 and Figure 5-3) to provide frequent connections between key growth centres, and to and from the Auckland city centre. The rapid and frequent service network includes two components:

  • Rapid services that have dedicated access to their own rights of way along high-density corridors (i.e. rail and Northern Busway services)

  • Frequent services provided by a network of frequent bus or ferry services operating along medium to high-density corridors, with bus-priority measures and connections to key activity and employment centres.

1.2 Maximise access to rapid and frequent services from the urban area

Design the rapid and frequent service network so that at least 40 per cent of the population within the Rural-Urban Boundary reside or work within 50 metre walk of a rapid or frequent service stop

1.3 Provide connections to the rapid and frequent service network

Design interchanges on the rapid and frequent service network to facilitate convenient connections to and between rapid and frequent services

1.4 Encourage mutually supportive land-use and public transport development policies

a. Work with the Auckland Council to ensure that the Unitary Plan includes land-use policies that support intensification at locations on the rapid and frequent service network

b. Promote transit-oriented development around key interchange locations on the rapid and frequent service network

c. Work with Auckland Council to ensure that the value added by investment in the rapid and frequent service network is part of apportioning costs for the adjoining land-use development proposals

d. Actively encourage and provide guidance to developers with greenfield and urban intensification proposals to complete an Integrated Transport Assessment to ensure land use is integrated with the rapid and frequent service network

e. Work with Auckland Council to ensure that the Unitary Plan and this Plan are mutually supportive

f. Work with Auckland Council to ensure that Integrated Transport Assessment guidelines are included in the Unitary Plan to ensure adequate consideration of public transport in development proposals

1.5 Integrate public transport services with parking policies

a. Promote the complementary design of public transport services and parking regulations and policies, including pricing

b. Design parking and Park-and-Ride pricing policies in manner that is supportive of public transport services, given prevailing fare strategies

c. Review area parking strategies and pricing policies to effectively manage parking around transport interchanges and to encourage usage of feeder bus services

End Table.

Page 52

6.2 Integrated service network

Objective 2: Simple, integrated services that connect people with where they want to go

The rapid and frequent service network described in Section 6.1 will be the core of a simplified route structure that will provide an integrated network of services. This will allow more convenient access to a wider range of destinations across a longer time span.

The network will be based on a hierarchy of route categories differentiated by their frequency and hours of operation, as shown in Figure 5-1. Routes will be designed to provide strong links between growth centres, with services and infrastructure providing support for intensification and development around key transport nodes.

The core of the new system will be the rapid and frequent service network, which will provide all-day, high frequency services at least every 15 minutes. This network will be complemented by a network of connector services that will extend all-day service coverage but at a lower frequency (generally half-hourly).

In addition, local, peak-only and targeted services will be tailored to meet specific demands, and to ensure a reasonable level of geographic coverage across the city.

Where possible, local and targeted services will be routed to enable passengers to make connections to the rapid and frequent service network at key interchanges, such as train and busway stations, and town centres. This will allow more passengers to access a wider range of destinations across a longer time span and will provide greater mobility.

This network of services will provide a simpler and better-integrated system, with improved opportunities for connections to more destinations. By focusing on what is important to most customers (i.e. improved service frequency and longer hours of operation), accelerated growth in overall patronage is likely to result.

In future, passengers may need to transfer between services to complete their journey, even though a lower frequency, point-to-point service may have operated previously. The success of the new network therefore depends upon enabling customers to move easily between the different services, particularly at key interchanges, and providing good quality customer information.

This approach is predicated on investment in improved interchanges and ticketing systems to enable easier transfers to be made without fare penalties. The policy framework for these changes is set out in Sections 6.3 and 6.5. Higher service frequencies and reliable on-time services are also required to deliver on this policy, with agreed business operating rules between connecting service providers.

The changing nature of demand means that there will be an ongoing need to consider new and innovative responses. The policies and actions below provide the opportunity for new services to be added to the network where these meet identified demand in a cost-effective and integrated manner. (See Footnote 4)

Footnote 4: For example, possible future connections between the Wynyard Quarter and Britomart are currently under review. End Footnote.

A review of the future role of ferry services within the new network is to be undertaken. This will consider options for improving existing services to provide better integration with the wider public transport network, as well as considering potential new ferry connections and supporting feeder services. The Ferry Plan will identify any changes that will need to be incorporated through future variations to the RPTP.

Chapter 7 and Appendix 1 provide more detail on the services that Auckland Transport has identified as being integral to the public transport network.

Implementation of the new network structure will require some significant changes to the bus service network. Auckland Transport intends to implement these changes in a staged programme of bus service network reviews, as detailed in Chapter 8.

Pages 53–55

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

2.1 Provide a simple, layered network of public transport services

Plan and procure services using the following integrated service layers:

  • Rapid services: frequent connections on the rail network and Northern Busway

  • Frequent services: core network of bus services that provide frequent connections between key growth centres, and to and from the Auckland city centre

  • Connector services: moderate-frequency services (generally half-hourly) with connections to metropolitan and town centres, employment and activity centres

  • Local services: access to metropolitan or town centres for areas without direct access to frequent or connector services

  • Peak-only services: point-to-point services to meet specific commuter demands and improve coverage or provide more direct services where required

  • Targeted services: services with flexible frequencies and time spans suited to demand, generally connecting residential area with their town centres and providing connections to the rapid and frequent service network

2.2 Ensure good access to public transport services from all parts of the urban area

Design routes so that at least 90 per cent of the population within the rural-urban boundary lives or works within 50 metre walk of a rail, bus or ferry stop

2.3 Provide a public transport network that maximises the range of travel options and destinations available

a. Design routes, interchanges and timetables to provide convenient connections between services and to minimise total journey time, including waiting time for connections

b. Design routes, interchanges and timetables to ensure that connections between services involve waiting time of no more than15minutes

2.4 Integrate ferry services into the public transport network

a. Work with key stakeholders and service providers to review the role that ferries currently play in the integrated public transport network, and the way in which this should evolve in the future

b. In collaboration with ferry operators and Auckland Council, prepare Ferry Plan by June 2014 that sets out the actions needed to better integrate ferry services, including deemed exempt services, into the Auckland public transport network, including provision for new and improved services, infrastructure, fare structures and feeder services as appropriate; and incorporate these actions into the RPTP by variation

2.5 Enable timely and cost-effective service provision in developing urban areas

a. Evaluate public transport infrastructure requirements and service demands in urban development areas

b. Where appropriate, introduce public transport services and infrastructure in new and developing urban areas in a timely and cost-effective manner

c. Encourage planning decision-makers and authorities to ensure that public transport corridors are identified and provided for in all significant new developments

d. Actively encourage and provide guidance to developers with greenfield and urban intensification proposals to complete an Integrated Transport Assessment to ensure adequate consideration is given to public transport requirements

2.6 Ensure that services respond to identified customer needs

a. Identify the needs of existing and potential public transport customers through research and demand analyses then consider these during service planning, reviews and procurement

b. Consult operators, customers and the public in the affected area during the service planning and reviews prior to procurement

c. Work with representatives of target groups to identify the potential for scheduled or demand-responsive services to particular facilities with regular travel demands, and implement appropriate improvements

d. Consider options for new services or modes where these are shown to meet customer demand in a cost-effective and integrated manner and introduce such changes as variation to this Plan where appropriate.

2.7 Maintain consistent levels of service in each service layer, appropriate to demand

Provide the following minimum service levels for each service layer:

  • Rapid and frequent: 15 minutes or better between 7am and 7pm on weekdays and at weekends (phased subject to demand)

  • Connector: 30 minutes or better between 7am and 7pm, weekdays and weekends (phased subject to demand)

  • Local, peak-only and targeted services (and services on rapid, frequent and connector routes

2.8 Enable timely and cost-effective service adjustments to meet demand

a. Put mechanisms in place within the PTOM contracting environment to allow service provisions to be adjusted efficiently and effectively to match demand, fare revenue and service yield changes and respond to new service opportunities by taking into account the following thresholds for patronage levels that trigger a service review:

  • Maximum loading thresholds: frequencies and capacity are monitored and adjusted to ensure that average loadings at the peak loading point on any route do not exceed 85 per cent of total capacity (including standing space) in any 15-minute period during the peak period or 60 per cent of total capacity (including standing space) in any 60-minute period during off-peak periods

  • Minimum demand thresholds: frequencies and hours of operation are monitored for persistently low loadings (i.e. where patronage at the maximum load point on a route is less than 50 per cent of seated capacity (averaged by the number of trips operated during any 20-minute period) during peak periods, or less than 30 per cent of seated capacity during off-peak periods), with revision and adjustments made to ensure that the PTOM contract continues to perform in an appropriate manner against relevant key performance indicators(KPIs)

b. Put mechanisms in place to enable efficient communication with public transport customers, to ensure that services can continue to respond to demand

2.9 Co-ordinate services for special events, to help meet the needs of each event and reduce demands on other parts of the transport system

a. Work with event venues and managers of major events to help create and market combined event and public transport packages and ticketing

b. Create an attractive public transport alternative for special events to encourage users on to the public transport system

c. Seek flexible system that obtains value from the supplier market when sourcing capacity

d. Where possible, create an annual calendar of planned major events to assist with the planning and provision of public transport and provide information for operators

e. Liaise with operators to understand their capacity, coverage availability and anticipated demand

f. Contract services, if necessary, to meet anticipated demand for special events

g. Ensure appropriate traffic-management measures are in place to help with successful service delivery

2.10 Investigate inter-regional services

a. Work with Auckland Council, Waikato District Council, Waikato Regional Council and NZTA to investigate provision of services to connect communities outside the regional boundary (e.g. Tuakau) with their nearest public transport interchanges, and to determine appropriate funding arrangements

b. Work with Auckland Council, Waikato District Council, Waikato Regional Council and NZTA to investigate the feasibility, costs and funding options for an extension of rail services to Tuakau

End Table.

Page 56

6.3 Infrastructure

Objective 3: A high standard of public transport infrastructure that supports service provision and enhances the customer experience

An efficient and effective public transport system relies on the provision of well-designed and well-maintained facilities including:

  • Roads

  • Bus stops and shelters

  • Transport interchanges

  • Rail tracks with associated equipment and stations

  • Ferry terminals and wharves

  • Park-and-Ride facilities

  • Cycle paths

  • Footpaths.

All of the above require clear, consistent branding, with service levels and information to meet customers' needs for an integrated, easy-to-use, customer-focused system.

Their design also needs to provide good access, safety and personal security at all stages of the journey, particularly for people with disabilities.

Since Auckland Transport was established in 2010, responsibility for public transport services and infrastructure provision now lies mainly within a single organisation, enabling the provision of infrastructure to be more closely integrated with changes to services. Auckland Transport has prepared an Integrated Transport Programme, in conjunction with NZTA, to ensure a coordinated approach to all transport investments in the Auckland region.

The new service network structure described in this Plan places considerable emphasis on good-quality interchange facilities to enable passengers to conveniently connect between services. It will also require selected improvements to other infrastructure such as bus priorities, to ensure that services are as reliable as possible.

These improvements will require an increased level of capital expenditure, which will need to be carefully prioritised. The key interchange facilities and other infrastructure improvements that are needed, in advance of the new network implementation, are identified in Chapter 8 as 'essential'.

Through the current service network planning process, Auckland Transport will identify a programme of further interchange developments and supporting improvements to bus stop locations, intersection designs and bus priorities that will enable connections to be made more easily in future.

These key projects will be incorporated into the RLTP in an appropriate sequence to support the new service network roll out. This will be followed by an ongoing programme to further improve journey time reliability and connection environments over time.

Auckland Transport will try to ensure that all customer touch-points are well-branded and have consistent service quality standards, in order to provide clearly integrated end-to-end customer experiences.

To extend the catchment area for the public transport network, Park-and-Ride facilities will continue to be developed at strategic locations, especially on the rapid and frequent service network.

Pages 57–59

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

3.1 Integrate infrastructure and service provision

a. Develop an ongoing programme of infrastructure improvements base on level of service indicators, with upgrades to improve journey times, reliability, safety and the connection environment for the customer

b. Ensure alignment between the service rollout programme and the RLTP, so that infrastructure requirements align with service procurement an implementation

c. Work with KiwiRail to ensure the rail network has sufficient capacity and reliability

d. Work with Auckland Council and (as required) KiwiRail to implement the City Rail Link

e. Work with bus operators and the Auckland Council to make provision for terminal layover facilities as necessary to ensure the efficient and reliable operation of bus services

f. Incorporate public transport service requirements and infrastructure requirements into corridor-management plans

g. Ensure that infrastructure projects that are necessary for the successful implementation of the new network are funded in a timely manner, by applying the prioritisation principles in Policy 9.3 to infrastructure funding decisions

3.2 Provide well-designed transport interchanges on the rapid and frequent service network

a. Locate and design transport interchanges to allow fast and convenient connections between services

b. Using the principles outlined in Appendix 5, develop guidelines for the design and operation of new and upgraded transport interchanges that are appropriate to their role in the network and the centres they serve, and ensure that existing and new interchanges are safe and comfortable for users, and that, wherever feasible, other traffic is excluded

c. Ensure that a consistent strategy for network branding, naming, way-finding and information is applied to all public transport facilities and infrastructure

d. Provide multi-modal real time passenger information and other network and local service information at transport interchanges and bus stops

3.3 Provide accessible, customer-focused facilities appropriate to the public transport route and the immediate locality

a. Provide bus, rail and ferry facilities that comply with design guidelines and which are appropriate for existing and future land use

b. Make central city and key interchange bus access, departure and interchange points easy for customers to understand and access

c. Ensure that bus stops and interchange facilities focus on providing appropriate amenity and shelter, while maximising their attractiveness as network access points from a customer perspective

d. Locate bus stops in a way that allows for quick and convenient access, especially for transferring passengers

e. Require public transport services to use the facilities and infrastructure provided through appropriate access agreements

f. Ensure that infrastructure enhances customer safety and security by meeting or exceeding the safety requirements set out in design guidelines, as appropriate to the location

g. Investigate the provision of off-board ticketing machines at high-demand bus interchanges and stops

h. Work with operators to develop and implement an appropriate charging regime for access to public transport infrastructure

3.4 Provide bus priority measures on key corridors

a. Using the triggers and principles in Auckland Transport's Code of Practice, develop and implement guidelines for the provision of bus-priority measures, and identify those that are to be implemented at different locations across the rapid and frequent service network

b. Use monitoring information on service frequency, passenger volumes, level of service delays and service reliability to inform the development of a bus-priority implementation programme

c. Promote 'Buses First' campaign that encourages motorists to give way to a bus leaving a stop

3.5 Provide Park-and-Ride facilities at appropriate sites

a. Complete Park-and-Ride strategy that clarifies the role of Park and Ride within the public transport network, and sets clear priorities for future investment, funding and pricing

b. Take steps to develop and operate Park-and-Ride facilities at selected peripheral locations to extend the catchment area of the public transport network and encourage patronage growth

c. Investigate and, where appropriate, develop Park-and-Ride facilities using the following criteria to determine investment priorities:

  • Park-and-Ride is planned as an integral part of the public transport network, extends the public transport customer base and encourages public transport patronage

  • Potential sites are located to intercept commuter trips from catchment areas that have high Park-and-Ride potential, based on assessed demand

  • Park-and-Ride facilities are located to relieve congestion by intercepting commuter traffic, and to ensure that vehicles accessing the facilities do not worsen local traffic congestion

  • New Park-and-Ride facilities are focused on outer areas where public transport services are limited, or to serve areas that are beyond the walk-up catchment of the rapid and frequent service network

  • Park-and-Ride provision is avoided in metropolitan and town centres, except as part of a staged transition to other uses

  • Park-and-Ride locations take fare zone boundaries into account

d. Where appropriate, introduce charges for Park-and-Ride facilities to manage demand and ensure that facilities complement the wider public transport system, and integrate charges with public transport fares, using the AT HOP card where practical

3.6 Integrate public transport with cycling and walking

a. Ensure integration between active modes and public transport services at both facility design and delivery stages, as appropriate

b. Include secure bicycle facilities at all interchanges, especially on the rapid and frequent service network, as appropriate

c. Provide convenient connections and visible signage between public transport, and cycling and walking networks

d. Work with public transport operators to provide on-vehicle facilities to improve the ease of passenger transfer between cycling and public transport services

e. Ensure appropriate design solutions to reduce the conflict between cyclists and buses in shared bus lanes. These should consider, in particular, network function, bus service frequency and the safety of cyclists

End Table.

Page 60

6.4 Service quality

Objective 4: A convenient and reliable public transport system using modern vehicles

A high-quality public transport system gets passengers quickly to where they want to go, and provides reliable whole-of-journey travel times.

Surveys and research show that the most important consideration for public transport users – and potential users – is reliability: a trip leaves on time and arrives at (or very close to) the scheduled time. This will be even more important with the transition to the new network structure outlined in this Plan, where some trips will require connections to be made with other services. Ensuring the reliability of connections will, therefore, be an important ingredient in the success of the new network.

Operational and fleet improvements, especially those on the rail network, will reduce journey times and increase service reliability. The increased frequencies, proposed as part of the core rapid and frequent service network, will reduce waiting times and mean that passengers can rely on making convenient connections between services.

Where bus services mix with traffic, journey times and reliability are affected by a number of external factors. An important tool for improving journey times and service reliability is the provision of measures that give priority to public transport services, such as bus lanes and traffic signal priority. As far as possible, Auckland Transport will provide these measures on major routes. Auckland Transport will also provide Real-Time Passenger Information System (RTPIS) links to the displays at public transport stations and stops, and links to the traffic-control system to provide priority for buses at traffic signals.

All new and used passenger service vehicles entering the bus fleet on contracted services within Auckland are required to conform to NZTA's Requirements for Urban Buses – a nationwide set of standards for bus quality and accessibility. Research with other stakeholders will be undertaken on future alternative fuel and bus traction vehicles.

Auckland Transport has prepared a Ferry Standard for new ferries used in urban passenger service for modern, low-emission ferries, and will ensure that vessels used on future contracts for ferry services conform to this standard.

Best-practice quality standards for rail rolling stock have also been identified and been incorporated into the specifications for new electric trains.

These requirements, along with rail electrification, will contribute to improved air quality and, consequently, improved public health.

Through achieving patronage growth (via mode shift), investment in electric trains and via a reduction in the average age of the bus fleet, Auckland Transport will contribute significantly to Auckland Plan targets to reduce transport-related (CO2) emissions. As modern buses replace the old fleet, and diesel locomotives are replaced with electric trains, the improved fuel efficiencies will reduce costs and improve environmental sustainability.

The new integrated network is expected to provide opportunities for more innovative and cost-effective approaches to service provision, including smaller vehicles such as mini-buses on feeder services and in situations where the terrain or demand characteristics mean that conventional buses are less suitable.

The PTOM provides for a partnering approach, where Auckland Transport works with operators to monitor service delivery, seek ongoing improvements and ensure that quality and reliability standards are being met. The prospect of a negotiated contract extension for consistent good performance provides an incentive for operators to initiate improvements.

Auckland Transport will also monitor trends in patronage to facilitate systematic improvement of the network through improved planning and operational and cost efficiencies.

Pages 61–63

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

4.1 Develop realistic, achievable timetables that are reliable and dependable

a. Develop new timetables using actual monitored travel times and test reliability before service implementation

b. Work with operators to monitor actual travel times using GPS real-time tracking and performance-measurement systems, and modify timetables as required to provide customers with a high standard of service reliability

c. Provide priority and, where appropriate, specific measures such as headway timetabling, to increase service reliability and reduce travel times, particularly on parts of the network that have high-frequency services

d. Prioritise funding applications for priority measures to support action (c) above

4.2 Improve public transport journey times to provide a service that is competitive with car travel

a. Introduce electric trains across the Auckland network to improve rail journey times

b. Increase AT HOP card usage and off-board payments to reduce boarding times

c. Provide bus-priority measures along key corridors to reduce bus journey times

d. Identify and eliminate significant delay points for public transport services

e. Consider specific measures to reduce the operating time of services, such as bus stop rationalisation or bus-priority signage, where appropriate

4.3 Provide a reliable, punctual, customer focused network of services

a. Specify whole-network standards for reliability and punctuality, and incentivise good service performance through the PTOM service agreements

b. Use RTPIS or other information for service performance management, and make this available to operators for performance monitoring and fleet management

c. Work in partnership with operators to continually improve reliability, punctuality, safety and all aspects of customer service

d. Effectively and efficiently monitor services and manage performance through appropriate contractual methods, as required

e. Identify failures in performance across the network and work in partnership with operators to rectify any identified problems in a timely manner

f. Work with operators to carry out driver and staff training, including customer-service training, to ensure a consistent high standard of presentation and performance

  • Specify driver, crew and staff training as a condition of any contract with Auckland Transport

  • Require operators to ensure that training and performance includes the safety of the public, both on and off the vehicle, including the safety of cyclists in bus lanes

  • Require the inclusion of disability-awareness training, and training on the needs of passengers with special needs, for all staff who are in contact with customers

4.4 Ensure that all vehicles and vessels meet required standards

a. Ensure that all contracted bus services in Auckland contracts comply with NZTA Requirements for Urban Buses and any approved additional requirements for air conditioning that Auckland Transport has put in place

b. Ensure that all new electric train fleet cars conform to the EMU – Technical Specifications stipulated by Auckland Transport at time of purchase

c. Ensure that all ferries used on contracted services comply with the Ferry Standard – for Vessels used in Urban Passenger Service, July 2010

d. Work with stakeholders to research opportunities for alternative bus vehicle fuels and traction methods, including electric buses

e. Specify vehicle size to match local service route geography and loadings, as required

f. Investigate methods to enable cyclists to better access the public transport system, including provision for bicycles on selected services

4.5 Ensure that service agreements encourage good operator performance

a. Incorporate specifications and a KPI regime, including service reliability and punctuality, quality, compliance, customer service and safety, in all PTOM service agreements

b. Terminate contracts for consistently poor performance

c. Where performance is consistently high and patronage has increased, ensure that appropriate reward mechanisms exist within contracts or through the PTOM framework

4.6 Monitor and continuously improve service delivery

a. Work with operators to access operational information in a timely fashion, and include conditions for timely operational reporting in PTOM contracts

b. Require contracted service operators to provide operational information, as required, including:

  • Reliability (early running)

  • Reliability (cancellation)

  • Punctuality (late running)

  • Patronage and passenger kilometres

  • Service inputs (in-service kilometres and hours delivered)

  • Farebox revenue

  • Safety and security

  • Driver training.

c. Until the roll-out of PTOM contracts is completed, encourage operators of commercial services that will form part of a unit to provide Auckland Transport with detailed planning, cost, revenue and service information, in addition to the information types listed under Section 127 of the LTMA, to enable Auckland Transport to plan a more efficient and effective network

d. Ensure that suppliers have sufficient information about service performance across the whole network, so that they can continually improve services offered to customers

e. Utilise shared, centrally accessed service specifications, performance and measurement data between Auckland Transport and operators to improve service performance

f. Use information from the RTPIS (or other systems for monitoring service delivery and managing service performance including through PTOM contracts)

g. Work with operators to agree on a monthly reporting framework for all contracted services, having regard to commercial confidentiality requirements

h. Collect customer feedback on service quality and performance (through surveys, customer complaint processes and other methods) including information about:

  • Bus loading (crowding)

  • Reporting timeliness

  • Customer satisfaction

  • Passenger facilities (on bus)

  • Complaints (including number resolved)

i. Publish service performance information, including PTOM league tables

End Table.

Page 64

6.5 Fares and ticketing

Objective 5: A fares and ticketing system that attracts and retains customers while balancing user contributions against public funding

Auckland's existing fare and ticketing system is complex, discourages connections between services and contains a number of inefficiencies – particularly in relation to the relatively high use of cash fares.

The Auckland Integrated Fare System (AIFS) project, which has been implemented from late 2012, is addressing many of these shortcomings. The AIFS will:

  • Significantly reduce the number of fare products

  • Allow the use of a single ticket across different operators

  • Reduce the financial penalty that is currently incurred for transfers (by initially providing a 50-cent discount for onward trips).

Fare products will be limited to discounted stored value for stage-based trips, monthly passes on

AT HOP-branded cards or single-trip cash fares.

Existing 10-trip stage-based tickets will be removed, as AT HOP stored value will provide the same discounts.

A daily cap is proposed when all transport modes are part of the AT HOP integrated ticketing system.

The new system will greatly simplify the range of fare products available in Auckland. However, Auckland Transport will continue to explore the use of specific products to encourage off-peak use, especially where this will help to stimulate additional patronage without increasing operating costs, and to reward customer loyalty.

The fares and ticketing system needs to reflect the following principles in order to contribute to the vision and outcomes of this Plan:

  • Simplicity: is easy for existing and potential users to understand and use

  • Integration: provides easy travel across the network, is responsive to the trips that people need to make and reinforces other improvements in the public transport system

  • Affordability: represents value for money for users and encourages more trips by public transport

  • Efficiency: minimises administrative and compliance costs and ensures that funders receive value for money.

While the AIFS project will significantly improve current arrangements, this Plan sets out the framework for further enhancements to the fares and ticketing system, to bring it into line with these principles.

Auckland Transport is investigating the introduction of a geographic, zone-based integrated bus and rail fare structure after completion of the AIFS project. This would enable the fares system to fully support the new network structure outlined in this Plan.

A zonal fare system would provide standard fares across different modes, with no penalties for transfers between services.

Proposed zone boundaries were published in the draft RPTP in October 2012. Submissions to the draft RPTP highlighted a number of issues with the proposed zones; this has prompted Auckland Transport to undertake a more-thorough review to ensure that the future fare structure meets the principles outlined above. The review will also include consideration of ferry fares and distance-based fares. Once the review and further consultation is completed, the new fare structure will be included in the RPTP as a variation.

Fares will be subject to regular review and adjustment, at least annually, to ensure that user charges keep pace with changes in operating costs, and that the farebox recovery targets in Section 6.9 are achieved. Auckland Transport will continue to review the targets to ensure that an optimum revenue balance between fares and patronage has been realised. As discussed in Section 6.9, it is intended to achieve improvements in farebox recovery through increasing patronage and carefully managing operating costs, with fare increases accorded a lower priority.

Fare levels will be set to incentivise the use of the AT HOP card and monthly passes in preference to cash fares. This will be achieved through differential adjustments to cash and AT HOP card fares during the annual fare reviews, allowing a progressive increase in the differential between AT HOP cards and cash.

Increased use of AT HOP cards will reward customer loyalty and improve boarding speeds, with associated improvements in reliability and operating costs. It will also reduce cash-handling costs and security risks.

The existing fares system in Auckland provides fare concessions for specific target groups. These will be retained during the AIFS transition period.

When integrated ticketing is in place, a review of concession levels and eligibility is proposed, including a possible change to SuperGold card use during the evening peak period (this is not available outside of Auckland) and tertiary discounts (these are often unavailable outside Auckland).

NZTA has sought a review of the evening peak senior concession with a view to its removal, on the grounds that it is nationally inconsistent and unaffordable.

Pages 65–66

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

5.1 Implement a fares and ticketing system that supports public transport service integration

a. Implement an integrated branded fare and ticketing scheme (AT HOP card) across all public transport operators, contracted services and deemed exempt services to allow the use of a single smartcard (or near-field contactless information exchange technology) across train, bus and ferry services

b. Require partner payment schemes to share a single public transport payment device to segregate a public transport stored-value purse or storage capacity

5.2 Provide integrated fares and ticketing across all bus, rail and ferry services

a. Implement a central fare revenue allocation system that meets the National Integrated Ticketing Interoperability Standards (NITIS) and the AIFS interoperability specification

b. Require service operators to procure and implement electronic integrated ticketing equipment, and to provide an electronic fare collection system that interfaces with the Auckland Transport central fare revenue allocation system and meets AIFS and NITIS specifications

c. Require all fare revenues collected by an operator's integrated ticketing equipment to be transferred, processed, and apportioned to eligible service providers by the Auckland Transport central fare allocation system

d. Ensure that all fare revenues collected by Auckland Transport, operators, and third parties are auditable and available for apportionment

e. Require that all public transport stored value be held by Auckland Transport in a dedicated public transport storage capacity

5.3 Investigate a zone-based fare structure, with standard fares across bus and rail operators

a. Review options for a geographic zone-based fare structure, with standard fares across bus and rail operators

b. Remove fare penalties for transfers between bus and rail services

c. Determine how ferry fares can be integrated into the fare structure

d. Undertake a review of the fare structure at least once every six years

5.4 Simplify the range of fare products available

a. Remove 10-trip tickets and most operator-specific ticket products, and replace with AT HOP card stored value (with an initial 10 per cent discount over cash fares) for single trips with a daily maximum fare cap, or a AT HOP card monthly pass

b. Transition the range of fare products to AT HOP card stored value time-based options (two hours, daily, monthly) for unlimited travel on a AT HOP card and single-trip cash fares

c. Investigate loyalty and high-use products including a monthly fare cap

d. Investigate off-peak daily and weekly travel pass options to encourage off-peak travel by residents and visitors, and provide fare incentives for off-peak family travel

5.5 Maintain fares at a level that will achieve farebox recovery targets

a. Set a standard fare schedule for all contracted and deemed exempt services participating in the Concessionary Fares Scheme prior to full PTOM implementation

b. Conduct regular annual reviews of operating costs and NZTA indexation levels to determine the extent of any fare adjustments required to maintain farebox recovery targets in Policy 9.2 (see Section 6.9)

c. Implement an annual standard fare adjustment on 1 January

d. Implement actions to reduce operating costs and/or increase patronage

5.6 Provide incentives to use integrated tickets

a. Set prices for AT HOP card stored value and monthly passes at a level that encourages their use in preference to cash

b. Progressively increase the AT HOP card stored value discount for travel through differential adjustments to cash and AT HOP card fares at the annual fare reviews, as appropriate

c. Improve the range of options for customers to purchase and top up AT HOP cards to improve uptake

5.7 Provide concession fares for target groups

a. Retain existing fare concessions for target groups, including:

  • Children under five: free

  • Seniors: free off-peak

  • Discounts for full-time school students, full-time tertiary students, legally blind members of the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind and Total Mobility cardholders

b. Review concessionary fare levels and affordability annually

c. Review concession levels and eligibility when integrated ticketing is implemented to ensure these are fair, affordable and consistent with national policy direction, and implement any changes arising from this review. The review will consider: a possible change to SuperGold card availability (to remove free travel during the evening peak period); a review of tertiary discounts and eligibility; and consideration of options for concession fares or discount schemes for low-income earners

d. Regularly review Total Mobility subsidy rates, in consultation with stakeholders, to determine whether they continue to meet user needs.

e. Consider short-term promotional fare discounts to support new or improved services or new infrastructure

5.8 Provide off-peak discounts to spread peak demand and improve operational efficiency

a. Actively investigate and implement off-peak fare discount options to spread peak demand and encourage off-peak trip-making, whilst maintaining Auckland Transport's overall farebox recovery targets

5.9 Ensure that all users pay the correct fares

a. Continue to advocate for the introduction of legislative change to enable the Police Commissioner to delegate enforcement powers to Auckland Transport staff to enforce fines for fare evasion

b. Implement a fare inspection, enforcement and auditing regime through a roving revenue protection team across all modes and operators, to ensure that all passengers pay the correct fare and to minimise the opportunity for fraud

End Table.

Page 67

6.6 Customer interface

Objective 6: Simple, visible and intuitive customer information and service

The move to a more-connected network needs to be accompanied by a more customer-focused approach to public transport. This includes:

  • A better understanding of, and response to, customer needs

  • A more proactive approach to dealing with complaints

  • Using customer feedback to identify opportunities for improvement

  • The provision of training at all levels

  • A stronger focus on customer service in contracts and supplier relationships.

A consistently branded network, integrated end-to-end service, and relevant and accurate customer information gives users confidence that they will reach their destinations on time or be able to make a timely and convenient change to another service.

A consistent brand will help customers to identify the network so it is easy to use, and clearly integrates all elements of the network into a single multi-modal system.

Auckland Transport recognises the need to provide customer information and communications material, in order to attract new customers and to encourage existing customers to continue or expand their use of public transport.

Auckland Transport will ensure that customers have access to relevant, accessible and easy-to-use information on services and timetables through a variety of media.

Marketing and promotion of the public transport network should not occur only when a new or revised product is launched into the market place. Recognising this, Auckland Transport will continue to promote the Auckland public transport system, both at a city-wide scale and at local levels, to continually raise awareness and knowledge of the services available to Aucklanders.

Current and potential users of the system often have very useful information to contribute to the service-planning process. Auckland Transport will develop mechanisms to better harness and utilise this information with regard to possible future changes to the service network or supporting infrastructure.

In addition to the policies listed in this section, customer service will be enhanced through the application of the policies and actions outlined in other sections, especially the infrastructure policies in Section 6.3, vehicle quality standards in Section 6.4 and integrated ticketing and fares in Section 6.5.

Pages 68–70

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

6.1 Use customer feedback to continually enhance the product

a. Develop and publicise a streamlined process for dealing with customer complaints, to provide for a 'one-stop-shop' approach, a clear escalation process and clarity on the respective responsibilities of Auckland Transport and operators

b. Develop better mechanisms for recording and using customer feedback, to provide a flow of market intelligence that feeds directly into continuous service-improvement processes and periodic service reviews

c. Increase the use of focus groups and other market-research techniques to improve Auckland Transport's understanding of the customer

6.2 Provide a consistent brand for Auckland Transport throughout the region

a. Develop, implement and manage a consistent brand across all of Auckland Transport's functions throughout the region

b. Develop, implement and manage a clear, simple and intuitive public transport service brand (including infrastructure, vehicles and all customer touch-points) to help customers with identification and way-finding throughout the service network

c. Ensure that Auckland Transport's brand is consistently displayed and clearly visible on all vehicles, vessels and appropriate infrastructure so that customers can easily identify this

d. Provide for Auckland Transport and operator brands to be co-branded, as appropriate

6.3 Provide a range of marketing material to attract potential customers

a. Ensure that appropriate marketing resources are put in place to meet the requirements of the new public transport system

b. Work with operators to provide excellent customer information to market their public transport products

c. Work with operators to build a strong public transport brand and on-road presence which highlights the levels of service offered by different elements of the network, and emphasises frequencies and ease of use

d. Work with operators to market the public transport system throughout the Auckland region on an on-going basis

e. Proactively market service improvements to key market segments, using a range of approaches and communication channels that are relevant to each group

f. Ensure that service changes are communicated to affected areas and groups before implementation, using a variety of communication channels, as appropriate

g. Promote and facilitate the use of public transport through business and school travel plans

6.4 Provide a wide choice of information channels to enable customers to plan their journeys

a. Provide up-to-date timetable information at all bus stops, ferry terminals and rail stations in a standardised format with the network brand described in Policy 6.2 above

b. Continue to provide information in formats that are accessible for people with impaired vision or hearing, including Braille maps and audio information at key sites and, in conjunction with operators, provide audio announcements on key routes, as appropriate

c. Provide information in languages other than English in locations where market analysis/customer feedback suggests this to be appropriate

d. Provide a call centre service for passenger information and feedback

e. Maintain – and continually improve – a public transport information and journey planner website

f. Continue to develop and roll out new and innovative technological solutions for accessing public transport service network and fare information (including the provision of data to third-party information suppliers and access to information technology at public transport facilities), with cost-effective provision as a driver in their development

g. Provide way-finding signs in the appropriate brand formats

h. Ensure that external vehicle destination displays comply with the requirements of NZTA's Requirements for Urban Buses

i. Provide appropriate travel information to promote journeys that better integrate active modes and public transport

6.5 Provide real-time passenger information

a. Install and maintain real-time display units at all interchanges and major stops across the network and at other sites, as appropriate

b. Install and maintain GPS tracking equipment on all public transport service vehicles with secure data downloads to provide accurate communications with RTPIS electronic displays and other real-time information products, and to monitor and manage service performance in real-time

c. Ensure that staff training on the use of interfaces to the RTPIS is carried out and remains up to date

d. Ensure real-time GPS-based systems and data are linked to monitoring and performance management

6.6 Provide a high-quality travel experience

a. Ensure that high-quality customer-service standards are maintained by all drivers on public transport services

b. Work with operators to provide excellent customer information through a range of on-board media

c. Ensure drivers are trained in the need for smooth acceleration and braking, which will have the multiple benefits of: improving the comfort and safety of passengers, reducing fuel consumption and decreasing vehicle emissions

6.7 Improve the connection infrastructure

a. Work proactively with funding partners to continuously improve the connection experience for customers at key locations, through ongoing investments in the appropriate infrastructure, information and way-finding

b. Undertake an ongoing monitoring programme to assess and enhance the connection environment across the network

6.8 Provide a range of customer feedback channels

a. Maintain high-quality standards at the Auckland Transport call centre

b. Aim to respond to customer feedback within 10 working days

c. Monitor feedback on service performance and convey this to operators, as appropriate, for onward action

End Table.

6.7 Assisting the transport-disadvantaged

Objective 7: Improved access for communities and groups whose needs are not met by the regular public transport system

An important focus of this Plan is to meet the needs of those who are least able to travel to basic community activities and services – the transport-disadvantaged.

Appendix 7 summarises Auckland Transport's assessment of the accessibility needs of the transport-disadvantaged in the Auckland region.

Providing a comprehensive network of public transport services goes some way to meeting these needs. However, it is recognised that some groups have specific needs that may be met more effectively by access to specialised passenger transport services and/or concessionary fares. Subject to continued funding availability, Auckland Transport will therefore continue to support specific services such as the Total Mobility service for people with disabilities, fare concession schemes and school bus services.

Auckland Transport will work with disability groups to ensure that the principles outlined in the Human Rights Commission report The Accessible Journey are reflected in the development of public transport services and infrastructure.

Auckland Transport will also work closely with representatives of target groups to identify the potential for scheduled or demand-responsive services to particular facilities with regular travel demands, and implement appropriate improvements.

Auckland Transport will also seek innovative and cost-effective ways to deal with accessibility problems in areas of low demand where scheduled public transport services may not always be appropriate (e.g. isolated and rural communities).

Pages 71–73

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

7.1 Provide a public transport network that is accessible and safe, particularly for vulnerable users

a. Identify target groups and areas where service planning can help the transport-disadvantaged, particularly vulnerable users such as children, senior citizens and people with disabilities

b. Work with stakeholders to identify and resolve accessibility and safety issues

c. Specify services (or specific elements of services) that must be operated by accessible vehicles which conform to NZTA guidelines and Auckland Transport requirements

d. Ensure that accessible information is widely available by using appropriate formats and media, including audio and visual (see Section 6.4)

e. Specifically consider the needs of the transport-disadvantaged when network changes are proposed and implemented, and take proactive steps to communicate changes to groups who may find the changes difficult to adapt to

7.2 Provide transport services and facilities for customers whose needs are not met by the regular public transport network

a. Locate and design facilities to ensure safe access for all customers to and around transport stops, stations and interchanges, with particular attention to the needs of people with disabilities

b. Facilitate participation in the Transport Accessibility Advisory Group (TAAG) (See Footnote 5)

Footnote 5: The Transport Accessibility Advisory Group (TAAG) is a regional group facilitated by Auckland Transport. Members include representatives of Auckland Transport, Auckland Council, accessibility interest groups (such as disability -sector organisations) and contracted public transport operators in the Auckland region. End Footnote.

c. Investigate better design of infrastructure and vehicles to improve access and usability for the transport-disadvantaged

d. Work with operators and Auckland Transport facilities managers to ensure that training for drivers, crew and other staff in contact with the public includes appropriate assistance for customers who have difficulty using public transport

e. Develop and support demand-responsive services in order to provide transport options for those who are unable to use regular public transport services

f. Continue to fund the Total Mobility scheme, including:

  • Establishing eligibility assessment processes

  • Contracting taxi and specialist operators to provide targeted services

  • Providing a discount on qualifying travel (up to a specified limit)

  • In eligible cases, assisting with the installation of hoists in specialist vehicles so that wheelchairs can be carried

  • Requiring all drivers on Total Mobility services to have specialist training in order to provide adequate and appropriate assistance to mobility-impaired people.

7.3 Provide safe public transport access for school students to and from their zoned and/or nearest school

a. Consider providing school buses in urban areas to schools not served by the regular bus network, or where capacity on that network cannot meet demand

b. As the public transport network is developed, review school bus routes in relation to the new network to avoid duplicating services and to manage resources

c. Improve the urban school bus network, in consultation with target schools, by adding services which carry 20 or more people to their nearest or zoned school on each trip (within budget constraints) (See Footnote 6)

Footnote 6: School buses in rural areas are supplied and funded by the Ministry of Education. End Footnote.

d. Consult with community transport planners when carrying out service reviews that affect school travel

e. Help schools to identify infrastructure requirements for safe school bus boarding and alighting areas, and ensure that suitable on-street facilities are provided and where practicable, provide for school bus transfers at safe locations where supervision is available

f. Work with the Ministry of Education to periodically review any issues that arise on the urban/rural fringes of the Auckland region, to ensure that effective and non-duplicative provision of bus services is achieved

7.4 Provide concessionary fares for the transport -disadvantaged and other target groups

a. Fund concessionary fares for the target groups identified in Policy 5.7

b. Subject to a review to ensure consistency with national policy directions, continue to support the SuperGold card free off-peak travel scheme for senior citizens, while adequate funding is available

c. Work with relevant government departments and Crown agencies to investigate opportunities to improve the affordability of travel for low-income earners and beneficiaries

7.5 Support public transport services and facilities that better meet the needs of individual, rural and isolated communities, taking into account value for money and local initiatives

a. Identify appropriate public transport services and facilities for rural areas by:

  • Engaging with local communities to develop proposals for community-driven initiatives to design and implement tailored public transport services on a trial basis

  • Working with local communities to identify and resolve funding and procurement issues

  • Working with local communities to explore the longer-term viability of services that have been trialled successfully

7.6 Ensure that transport services and facilities account for socio-economic characteristics

a. As part of the service design reviews and general route planning, consider the local socio-economic characteristics including the deprivation index, and any greater need to provide public transport access within, to and from particular communities

b. Identify appropriate public transport services and facilities to such areas

c. Work with social agencies to promote understanding of the smartcard and its associated benefits for low-income and beneficiary households, including the need for registration to obtain access to concessionary fares (where eligible)

End Table.

6.8 Procurement and exempt services

Objective 8: A procurement system that supports the efficient delivery of public transport services

Amendments to the LTMA in 2013 have introduced a new policy and operating framework for the procurement and management of urban bus, rail and ferry services. This new framework, known as the Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM), seeks to build a commercially based partnership between procuring authorities (including Auckland Transport) and public transport operators. It is also designed to provide opportunities for competitors to access the public transport market, to provide incentives to reduce reliance on subsidies by promoting increased commerciality of service provision, and to provide a more-transparent approach to service planning and procurement.

In future, all public transport services (except for exempt services) will be procured through performance-based service contracts, replacing the previous mix of contracted and registered commercial services. This will create an environment where goals and objectives are aligned through collaborative planning, joint investment, performance incentives, and shared risks and rewards.

All public transport services described in this Plan (other than exempt services) will be required to be provided under contract to Auckland Transport as part of a unit, in order to implement the policies and actions described in this Plan. In summary, units have been determined by grouping services around geographic catchments and taking into account the need for units to be of sufficient size to ensure a competitive service supplier market and to deliver efficient and effective services which can lead to increased patronage.

A transition plan will be developed by Auckland Transport in conjunction with incumbent operators and providers of previously registered commercial services that will form part of a unit, to transition those existing services to the fully contracted public transport framework under the PTOM.

The transition process will follow the one developed through the PTOM Working Group and chaired by the Ministry of Transport. Participants are NZTA, Auckland Transport, Greater Wellington Regional Council, Bus and Coach Association, NZ Bus, and Ritchies Transport Holdings. The policies in this section are designed to support this process and give effect to the requirements of the LTMA.

Procurement of rail services recognises that the Auckland passenger rail system is undergoing significant change during this period. Changes include the introduction of integrated off-board ticketing, electrification and associated new trains, and the full roll-out of real-time passenger information systems for rail. A variation – and extension – of the current rail contract until June 2016 provides continuity during this period but procurement of services beyond June 2016 will be subject to a competitive tender process.

In line with the principles set out in Section 115 of the LTMA (see Section 2.1), the PTOM adopts a partnership approach, while also recognising the other principles: towards increasing commerciality (the contribution of fare revenue to total operating costs), reducing reliance on public subsidies and increasing patronage while giving the public confidence in competitive pricing for public transport provision.

Growing the business in this manner requires a two-tiered process – through improvements to the network as a whole, or through improvements within a particular PTOM unit (a group of routes bundled together for contracting purposes).

All services in Auckland will be subject to a PTOM contract, with the exception of exempt services. Exempt services will continue to operate outside the PTOM and these will be specifically identified in the transition plan.

In addition, there will be a transition period between the adoption of this Plan and full implementation of the PTOM contracting environment. Existing contracts will be managed in accordance with Auckland Transport's procurement strategy, with required changes (either to manage capacity issues or to address matters related to the roll-out of PTOM contracts) managed through the variation processes defined in existing contractual arrangements.

Pages 74–78

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

8.1 Ensure the appropriate allocation of roles, responsibilities and risk between Auckland Transport and operators using the PTOM

a. Work with operators, suppliers and funders to implement the PTOM to deliver an efficient and effective range of public transport services across the region, resulting in increased patronage and fare revenues that cover a greater proportion of operating costs and reduce reliance on subsidies. Specifically:

  • All public transport services that are integral to the regional public transport network described in this Plan (other than deemed exempt services) will be grouped into units, based around geographic catchments, serving identifiable sets of existing or potential customers and taking into account the need for units to be of sufficient size to ensure a competitive service supplier market and deliver efficient and effective services which can lead to increased patronage

  • All public transport services described in this Plan (other than exempt services) will operate under a contract with Auckland Transport, in order to implement the policies and actions in this Plan

  • Each unit will form the basis of an individual PTOM contract with Auckland Transport

  • The risk/reward model that will be incorporated into the PTOM contracts will describe a shared responsibility between the operator and Auckland Transport for growing the business, and sharing the fare revenue risk and reward

  • The PTOM contracts will include KPIs around service performance, quality, cost-effectiveness and safety

  • The PTOM contracts will provide incentives to grow patronage and service commerciality and reduce subsidies through the publication of 'league tables', which rank the commerciality, patronage growth and other performance indicators of each unit. Auckland Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan: 2013 Policies Actions Transport's expectation is that higher-ranking contracts may be offered an extended term through negotiation, and lower-ranking contracts may be competitively tendered (subject to performance and overall satisfactory operation of PTOM contractual arrangements)

b. Explicitly set out a structured process for the use and sharing of information as part of the PTOM implementation phase – including a clear description of rights and obligations – so that appropriate access to, and treatment of, all information is ensured

c. Adhere to the NZTA guidelines on PTOM implementation once these are available

8.2 Ensure service continuity to the travelling public

a. Incorporate appropriate service continuity provisions into the PTOM unit contracts that include appropriate mechanisms for eliciting changes to a unit when network or service review processes deem this necessary

b. Provide appropriate lead times for all service provision to allow operators sufficient time to secure resources

8.3 Identify specific exempt services that are not subject to PTOM contracts

a. Provide for the following deemed exempt services to operate within the Auckland region without PTOM contracts:

  • Inter-regional services that operate without a direct subsidy from Auckland Transport

  • Existing registered commercial ferry services, in operation at 30 June 2011, where the service comprised all of the trips conducted on every route operated by the service

  • Existing registered commercial bus services in operation at 30 June 2011 that did not offer fares set by Auckland Transport

8.4 Adopt a partnership approach to network planning and service changes

a. Use the PTOM contracting model to enter and manage contractual relationships with operators. Each PTOM unit will form an individual PTOM contract with Auckland Transport. Each PTOM contract will have three tiers of agreement: a Regional Agreement, a Partnering Agreement and a Unit Agreement

b. Enter into a Regional Agreement with all contracted operators, and on a voluntary basis with operators of exempt services, to provide a partnership approach towards network planning, service procurement and delivery management including consideration of:

  • Management of the PTOM transition to a fully contracted service model with discontinued registered commercial services

  • Service change management

  • Service performance management

  • Network management including customer service, experience, branding, information and marketing

Note: These operator engagement processes will not replace the service review process outlined in Section 6.10 but will be used to develop the service change proposals to a level where they can be released for public consultation

c. Enter into a Partnering Agreement with all operators of PTOM units to provide regional consistency for service contract terms and conditions

d. Enter into a Unit Agreement with each PTOM unit following a competitive market tender or through incumbent operator negotiation using tendered prices for benchmarking purposes

e. Wherever possible, implement significant network changes at the start of the PTOM contract tendering/negotiation rounds. If this is not possible, or if the need for significant change arises during an existing contract, the following procedure will be used:

  • Proposals will be developed by Auckland Transport to cover all impacted PTOM units, with detailed forecast cost and revenue consequences

  • Affected operators will be consulted, with a view to negotiating an amendment to the PTOM unit structure to allow the changes to be implemented

  • If all operators of affected PTOM units cannot agree a negotiated solution, following mediation, Auckland Transport reserves the right to tender the affected PTOM units

f. Work with contracted operators to develop a business plan for each PTOM unit that aims to grow its commerciality and passenger demand, subject to the overall network development plans and targets in the RPTP; the business plan will be jointly owned by Auckland Transport and the unit operator, and will clearly define individual and joint responsibilities

g. Revisit the business plan at regular intervals (at least annually)

h. Publish an annual report of performance league tables showing PTOM unit patronage growth and commerciality

i. Ensure that information exchanged between Auckland Transport and operators under PTOM contracts includes:

  • Reliability and punctuality of services

  • Patronage, passenger kilometres and farebox revenues (on a tag-on, tag-off basis for integrated ticketing customers and on a pre-stage basis for others)

  • Safety and security

  • Staff training

j. In consultation with operators, agree on protocols for the exchange of information on service inputs and cost efficiency, while ensuring appropriate arrangements are in place to protect data confidentiality

8.5 Ensure that rail services procurement recognises the need to complete the transition to a fully electrified system

a. Competitively tender rail services when the introduction of electric trains is completed

b. Combine rail PTOM units (see Table 7-2) into PTOM contracts, where appropriate, to provide improved efficiency and effectiveness of services

8.6 Manage the transition from current contracts and registered commercial services to the future PTOM contracting environment

a. Procure PTOM contracts for bus services (other than deemed exempt services) in accordance with a procurement strategy approved by NZTA and in accordance with the PTOM transition model developed by Auckland Transport in consultation with the PTOM Working Group and detailed in Appendix 8

b. De-register any previously registered commercial service that forms part of a unit on the date on which the new unit contract takes effect (as indicated in Table 7-2)

c. Procure PTOM unit contracts for ferry services (other than deemed exempt services) in accordance with a procurement strategy approved by NZTA and in accordance with the PTOM ferry model and transition model (under development by the PTOM Ferry Working Group)

d. Where appropriate, combine ferry PTOM units in Table 7-2 into PTOM contracts to provide improvements in service efficiency and effectiveness

e. Manage variations to existing contracts, to address capacity issues and/or matters related to the PTOM unit roll out, in accordance with the provisions in existing service contracts

8.7 Ensure that the operation of exempt services does not adversely affect the wider public transport network

a. Assess all applications to operate or vary exempt services according to the statutory requirements. Auckland Transport may decline to register an exempt service, or vary the route or routes of an exempt service, where the service or variation is:

  • Likely to have a material adverse effect on the financial viability of any unit

  • Likely to increase the net cost to Auckland Transport of any unit

  • Contrary to sound traffic management or any environmental factor identified by Auckland Transport as important to the region

  • A service that is identified in this Plan as being integral to the public transport network in the region

b. Encourage operators of deemed exempt services that Auckland Transport considers to be integral to the regional public transport network, as described in Table 7-2, to meet the minimum service levels for frequency and hours of operation specified in Appendix 1

c. Require a minimum notice period of 65 days for the variation or withdrawal of any exempt service described in Table 7-2. (Note: This notice period may be waived for exempt services that are not integral to the regional network)

d. Should any deemed exempt service described in Table 7-2 cease to be operated by the relevant public transport operator, the relevant service will be deregistered with effect on and from one day following the date on which the relevant route description of the deemed exempt service will then become a unit for the purposes of the LTMA

e. Where appropriate, charge operators of exempt services and units a reasonable infrastructure access charge, in addition to charges to recover the costs of customer information, customer services and management services to ensure equitable treatment between exempt services and units

End Table.

Page 79

6.9 Funding and prioritisation

Objective 9: Effective and efficient allocation of public transport funding

In preparing this Plan, Auckland Transport has reviewed the amount of public transport funding that is likely to be available within the region over the next 10 years (see Section 2.3).

In the short to medium term, funds are expected to be similar to current levels, although additional funds will be available to meet the operating costs associated with current commitments to integrated ticketing and rail system improvements.

Although NZTA is maintaining investment for existing services at current levels, the 2012–2015 National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) increases the amount of funding for public transport. Most of the increase will be used to cover existing commitments including running costs associated with the Auckland Integrated Fares System (AIFS) and rail rolling stock, and to track access charges. Beyond this, any additional funds will be targeted at peak services that help to relieve severe congestion (based on robust business cases yet to be developed).

Auckland Transport has responded to this situation by developing a new network structure that is intended to provide enhanced levels of service within the existing resources. In addition, introducing the PTOM is expected to further enhance efficiency, through improved route design, contracting with marketable units and increased market competition. Any savings generated by these changes can be reinvested into additional services.

Auckland Transport has also adopted a farebox recovery policy, in line with NZTA requirements for such a policy to be included in the Plan. The farebox recovery policy aims to increase the proportion of user fares to operating costs from the current 44.3 per cent, to approximately 50 per cent by 2015–18, to contribute to the national target of 50 per cent. To achieve this, Auckland Transport will give priority to actions that grow patronage (especially where spare capacity is available) and reduce operating costs, in preference to simply raising fares. See Appendix 6 for further details on the development of the farebox recovery policy.

While these changes are expected to deliver significant improvements in the effectiveness and efficiency of the public transport system, achieving the longer-term objectives of the Auckland Plan will require additional investment.

In particular, additional funds will be needed to develop the City Rail Link and to support the operating costs associated with increasing the system capacity to meet the Auckland Plan patronage and mode-share targets. Auckland Transport will continue discussions with its funders to seek appropriate funding allocations for public transport, to deliver its short- and long-term objectives.

Auckland Transport is conscious of the need to ensure that the public funds used to support the public transport system are used wisely and within required time frames, in order to deliver cost-effective transport solutions for the region.

Auckland Transport will continue to seek cost efficiencies in the delivery of public transport services, and implement adjustments to services where financial performance is poor.

Auckland Transport also recognises that choices need to be made on how to best to deliver public transport enhancements if the required funding is not available in future. Therefore, Auckland Transport has established a set of strategic priorities for expenditure on the public transport system that identify where available funds should be directed.

These strategic priorities focus on incorporating existing services into the new connected service network, introducing integrated ticketing and fares, and improving the rail system through more-frequent services and electrification. They also prioritise an increase in the capacity of the rapid and frequent service network, where funding allows.

Pages 79–81

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text, except for the section of tabular data. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

9.1 Improve value for money from existing public transport funding

a. Implement the new network structure outlined in Chapter 5 and detailed in Sections 6.1 and 6.2

b. Maximise the use of additional rail capacity through the new network structure

c. Implement the PTOM changes outlined in Section 6.8

d. Undertake regular reviews of service effectiveness and value for money

e. Promote and market a simple and intuitive public transport product

9.2 Increase the level of farebox recovery

a. Take steps to achieve the following Farebox Recovery Ratio (FRR) targets:

Mode

2012 FRR

Target FRR 2013–14

Target FRR 2015–18

Bus

47.7%

47–50%

49–52%

Rail

26.3%

28–33%

40–45%

Ferry (See Footnote 7)

78.4%

75–80%

75–80%

Total

44.3%

45–48%

49–52%

Footnote 7: The ferry FRR includes a number of significant exempt services, which may be excluded from the FRR definition in future. End Footnote.

b. Take the following actions to achieve the FRR targets:

i. Work with operators to deliver increased fare revenue through measures to increase patronage, particularly where spare capacity exists on current services

ii. Identify and implement opportunities for improvements to procurement arrangements for public transport, including implementation of the PTOM where this has the potential to reduce operating costs

iii. Deliver increased rail patronage and reduced rail operating costs as a result of electrification

iv. Continue to undertake regular reviews of service cost-effectiveness and implement improvements, where appropriate, to reduce average unit operating costs

v. Continue to promote improvements to infrastructure and services that contribute to more-efficient operating conditions for public transport and to lower operating costs (e.g. bus-priority measures)

vi. Continue an annual fare review and adjustment process, and ensure that fare increases at least keep pace with increased operating costs (as measured through NZTA indexation) with additional modest increases when necessary to maintain progress towards the FRR target

c. Closely monitor the impact of fare changes on patronage, and review the farebox recovery policy if growth in patronage is threatened by fare increases

d. Work with funding agencies to review the economic value of public transport to non-users, and ensure that the farebox recovery policy is consistent with this over time

e. Review the level and availability of concession fares, and eligibility criteria to ensure these are cost-effective and consistent with national policy directions

9.3 Direct available funding to high priority activities

a. Use the four-stage intervention process from the Integrated Transport Programme to prioritise and phase investments:

i. Ensure optimal operation, maintenance and renewal of infrastructure

ii. Make better use of networks

iii. Manage demand efficiently and effectively

iv. Invest in new infrastructure, services and technology

b. Ensure that the available capital funding is directed to public transport infrastructure projects that will make the most effective contribution to the new network structure

c. Allocate available funding according to the following priorities:

i. Complete the implementation of integrated ticketing, integrated fares and rail electrification

ii. Implement changes to the network to maintain or improve service levels within existing resource levels

iii. Improve rail capacity as a result of electrification

iv. Improve public transport infrastructure to enable more cost effective provision of services (e.g. bus priorities and improved network connectivity)

v. Further increase capacity on the rapid and frequent service network

vi. Improve frequencies on connector and local services

vii. Introduce new routes and increase service coverage beyond existing areas

viii. Implement initiatives to improve customer service and information

9.4 Encourage the development of new funding mechanisms for public transport

a. Support the examination of potential new funding and financing mechanisms for transport in Auckland

End Table.

Pages 82–83

6.10 Monitoring and review

Objective 10: A system of monitoring and review that supports continuous improvement

The Auckland Plan has identified a set of medium- and long-term targets for public transport, and the policies and actions in this Plan are designed to help achieve these targets.

The targets include:

  • Double public transport from 70 million trips in 2012 to 140 million trips by 2022 (subject to additional funding)

  • Increase the proportion of trips made by public transport into the city centre during the morning peak from 47 per cent of all vehicular trips in 2011 to 70 per cent by 2040

  • Increase annual public transport trips per person from 44 to 100 by 2040

  • Increase the proportion of people living within walking distance of frequent public transport stops from 14 per cent in 2011 to 32 per cent by 2040.

Auckland Transport will regularly monitor progress towards these Auckland Plan targets. It will also monitor the implementation of this Plan and use a series of KPIs to determine how well the public transport system is achieving its objectives. This information will be regularly published to ensure that the public has access to up-to-date information on service performance.

The LTMA requires Auckland Transport to ensure that the RPTP is kept current for a period of not less than three years in advance, but not more than 10 years, in advance. The RPTP may be reviewed or varied from time to time, but it must be reviewed, and varied if necessary, when the public transport components of the Regional Land Transport Plan are approved or varied.

Auckland Transport has developed a policy to determine whether or not any proposed variation to the RPTP is significant (see Appendix 9). If the proposed variation to the RPTP is significant, Auckland Transport must consult on such variation in accordance with the requirements of Section 125 of the LTMA.

As noted in Chapter 8, Auckland Transport will undertake a staged programme of service reviews across the region to implement the new network design.

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Policies; Actions. End Note.

10.1 Undertake regular monitoring and reporting of service, unit and system performance

a. Implement monitoring, reporting and analysis of service trip and unit performance (including patronage, ticket sales and type, travel time, punctuality and reliability, passenger wait time and other matters) against patronage, farebox recovery, service level and service performance targets

b. Prepare a regular public report on progress using the following KPIs, segregated where possible by weekday peak, inter-peak, evening and weekend time periods:

  • Total public transport boardings

  • Passenger kilometres travelled

  • Public transport share of peak trips to the city centre

  • Proportion of residents within 500 metres walk of a stop on the rapid and frequent service network

  • Proportion of jobs located within 500 metres walk of a stop on the rapid and frequent service network

  • Patronage growth on the rail network

  • Patronage growth on the Northern Busway

  • Patronage growth on all other bus services

  • Patronage growth on ferry services

  • Patronage growth on school bus services

  • Journey times on selected rapid and frequent service network routes relative to equivalent journeys by car

  • Service improvements delivered to schedule within agreed budgets

  • Customer satisfaction ratings for public transport services

  • Customer rating of public transport value for money

  • Reliability: late running and cancelled services

  • Punctuality: proportion of services 'on time' (i.e. arriving within five minutes of scheduled time at timing points)

  • Proportion of timed connections arriving within 15 minutes of connecting service

  • Proportion of services with disability access

  • Seat utilisation

  • Operating subsidy per passenger kilometre

  • Farebox Recovery Ratio

10.2 Regularly review and update the Plan to take account of changing circumstances

a. Undertake a staged programme of service reviews and incorporate any necessary amendments to service descriptions through a variation to the RPTP

b. Use the monitoring information collected as part of Policy 10.1 above and work with operators to introduce variations to services where required to improve efficiency and effectiveness, following consultation with affected parties; and incorporate any required amendments to service descriptions through a variation to the RPTP

c. Maintain an up-to-date register of RPTP service descriptions, including a record of any variations

d. Complete a full review of the RPTP at the same time as, or as soon as practicable after, the adoption of the next Regional Land Transport Plan, to determine whether any variation is needed to take account of changing circumstances

10.3 Ensure appropriate public consultation on future Plan variations

a. Use the policy on significance in Appendix 9 to determine the appropriate level of consultation undertaken for any proposed variation to the RPTP

End Table.

Page 84

7 Description of services

This chapter details the services that Auckland Transport has identified as being integral to the Auckland regional public transport network. These services (other than deemed exempt services) have been grouped into geographically defined units, and include the different types of public transport services that will be procured and provided by Auckland Transport under this Plan. Given the transitional nature of the RPTP – from the current mix of services to an integrated service network that will provide a connected set of frequent services – the details below focus largely on the new network, with the current network described in broad terms only.

Pages 85–86

7.1 Scheduled services – current network

Auckland Transport inherited from the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA) a range of scheduled public transport services in the Auckland region.

In time, these services will be replaced with those listed in the new network described in the following section but in the interim, they will continue to be provided as described here.

Service descriptions are provided for 68 geographically-defined route groups as listed in Table 7-1 below. These generally include all of the services in a specific area and/or corridor, with at least part of their route in common.

Table:

Table 7-1: Route groups – current network

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. End Note.

1. Waiheke

2. Mt Eden Rd

3. Gillies Ave

4. Dominion Rd

5. Sandringham Rd

6. New North Rd

7. Pt Chevalier

8. CBD circuits

9. Herne Bay

10. Richmond Rd

11. New Lynn locals

12. Glen Innes and Ellerslie

13. Airbus Express

14. Mt Wellington

15. Glendowie

16. Tamaki Drive

17. St Heliers – Newmarket

18. Isthmus crosstowns

19. Remuera

20. Devonport

21. Hibiscus Coast

22. Northern Express

23. Beach Haven

24. Albany

25. Beach Rd

26. Forrest Hill

27. Sunnynook

28. Bayview

29. Windy Ridge

30. Glenfield

31. Northcote

32. Bayswater

33. Pukekohe

34. Manukau – Airport

35. Onehunga

36. Papakura

37. Manurewa

38. Gt South Rd and Otara

39. Puhinui

40. Mangere

41. Botany

42. Botany – CBD

43. Bucklands Beach

44. Howick

45. Ranui and Swanson

46. Te Atatu

47. Glen Eden

48. Kelston

49. Titirangi and Laingholm

50. Green Bay

51. Massey and Hobsonville

52. Gulf Harbour ferry

53. Devonport ferry

54. Stanley Bay ferry

55. Bayswater ferry

56. Pine Harbour ferry

57. Rakino ferry

58. Half Moon Bay ferry

59. West Harbour ferry

60. Birkenhead ferry

61. Waiheke ferry

62. Great Barrier ferry

63. Hobsonville

64. Beach Haven ferry

65. Western rail

66. Eastern rail

67. Southernrail

68. Onehunga rail

Detailed descriptions for the services contained within these route groups are contained in Appendix 2. These descriptions include detail on route numbers, suburbs and destinations served, indicative service frequencies and hours of operation.

End Table.

Pages 87–90

7.2 Scheduled services – new network

The defining features of the new network are described in Section 6.2 and include the frequency and time span of services (hours of operation across days of the week).

A further distinction is drawn between rapid services that operate in their own right-of-way (rail and busway services) and other services which occupy general road space, with priority measures applied as appropriate.

Table 7-2 below summarises the scheduled public transport services that Auckland Transport has identified as being integral to the new network. The services have been grouped into units based around geographic catchments serving identifiable sets of existing or potential customers. The grouping of services has also taken into account the need for units to be of sufficient size to ensure a competitive service supplier market and to deliver efficient and effective services that can increase patronage.

Table 7-2 also includes four route descriptions of services which are currently in operation that are deemed exempt services. While these services are integral to the public transport network, as deemed exempt services they are not provided under contract with Auckland Transport. Should any deemed exempt services cease to be operated by the relevant public transport operator, the relevant service will be deregistered one day following the date that the relevant public transport operator ceases to operate it. The relevant route description of the deemed exempt service will then become a unit for the purposes of the LTMA.

With the exception of deemed exempt services, the route descriptions listed in Table 7-2 are units for which Auckland Transport intends to provide financial assistance (subject to improved commerciality of the unit over time) where required, through PTOM contracts. Table 7-2 also shows the indicative start dates for services in each of the units.

Table:

Table 7-2: Public transport units and deemed exempt services – proposed 2016 network

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. The following headings have been omitted: Unit number; Route description; Indicative start date. Note to table follows. End Note.

Although the allocation of specific routes to units is still subject to a period of ongoing negotiation with public transport operators in the region, the individual services that make up each unit, together with their proposed target frequencies and indicative hours of operation, are listed in Appendix 1.

Bus services

1: City LINK: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

2: Inner LINK: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

3: Richmond Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

4: Great North – Tamaki: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

6: New North Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

7: Sandringham Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

8: Dominion Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

9: Mt Eden Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

10: Manukau Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

12: Remuera Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

14: Glen Innes: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

16: Epsom: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

17: Hospitals: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

18: Mt Eden Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

19: Balmoral Rd Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

20: Mt Albert Rd Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

21: Hillsborough Road Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

24: Waiheke: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

25: Titirangi: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

26: Waikumete: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

27: Te Atatu: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

28: Ranui: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

29: Hobsonville: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

30: North Western Motorway: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

31: Upper Harbour Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

32: Albany: Q2 2015 – Q4 2016

33: Glenfield Rd: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

34: Wairau Valley: Q2 2015 – Q4 2016

35: Akoranga West: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

36: Highbury Local: Q2 2015 – Q4 2016

37: Birkenhead: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

40: Northern Express: 1 Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

41: Northern Express: 2 Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

42: Albany to Newmarket via Ponsonby: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

43: Devonport: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

44: Lower East Coast Bays: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

45: Upper East Coast Bays: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

46: Hibiscus Coast: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

47: Hibiscus Coast Schools: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

46: Warkworth: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

50: Ti Rakau Drive: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

52: Howick to Panmure: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

53: Botany Crosstown: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

55: Pakuranga Rd: Q4 2015 – Q2 2016

60: Auckland Airport: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

61: Mangere Bridge: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

62: Otahuhu: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

63: Papatoetoe/Otara: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

64: Manurewa: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

55: Papakura: Q2 2014 – Q1 2015

67: Pukekohe: Q2 2015 – Q4 2015

Deemed Exempt: Airbus Express: Current

Ferry services

TBC: Pine Harbour ferry: TBC

TBC: Birkenhead ferry: TBC

TBC: West Harbour ferry: TBC

TBC: Hobsonville/Beach Haven ferry: TBC

TBC: Bayswater ferry: TBC

TBC: Gulf Harbour ferry: TBC

TBC: Half Moon Bay ferry: TBC

TBC: Rakino ferry: TBC

Deemed Exempt: Devonport ferry: Current

Deemed Exempt: Stanley Bay ferry: Current

Deemed Exempt: Waiheke ferry: Current

Rail services

N/A: Southern rail line: Current; new tender 2016

N/A: Eastern rail line: Current; new tender 2016

N/A: Western rail line: Current; new tender 2016

N/A: Onehunga rail line: Current; new tender 2016

N/A: Pukekohe rail line: Current; new tender 2016

End Table.

Page 91

7.3 Targeted services

In addition to the scheduled services already mentioned in this chapter, Auckland Transport proposes to provide financial support to the following targeted services.

Total Mobility

Total Mobility is a demand-responsive service for people with disabilities who are registered users of the scheme. The Total Mobility scheme helps people who are unable to use regular public transport services to enhance their participation in the community by providing access to appropriate transport.

Total Mobility services are provided in the form of subsidised door-to-door transport services by taxi and specialist transport operators under contract to Auckland Transport in areas where scheme transport providers operate. Eligible users carry an ID card that is swiped through a card-reader connected to the taxi-meter so the correct fare is recorded. All vehicles used on Total Mobility contracts must be equipped with approved card-readers and meet Auckland Transport quality standards and all drivers must complete an Auckland Transport-approved specialist training course.

In addition to subsidising passenger trips, Auckland Transport each year provides an opportunity for operators to apply for a subsidy for installing wheelchair hoists and making the associated modifications to vehicles. Total Mobility services may be provided using taxis or small passenger-service vehicles (shuttles).

School bus services

Auckland Transport funds a number of school bus services that are used exclusively to transport students to schools. These services are designed to meet an identified demand for school travel in situations where scheduled services cannot provide sufficient capacity or route coverage to meet the demand and/or where a school bus service provides the most cost-effective alternative to private vehicle use.

Auckland Transport's provision of school services is restricted to the urban area of the Auckland region, as the Ministry of Education is responsible for services in the rural areas of the region. In addition, Auckland Transport has no responsibility for school services that are procured commercially between individual schools and bus operators.

Auckland Transport's current school services are described in Appendix 2. As part of the transition from the current contracting environment to the PTOM, these school bus services will be allocated to individual PTOM units, as described in Appendix 1.

When the future service network has been rolled out across the region, there will be a comprehensive review of supported school bus services to ensure that the new network meets the requirements for school travel.

The driving factors behind this review will be to ensure that demand for contracted services remains strong, that the services represent good value for money and that a more efficient way of serving the demand through the scheduled public transport network does not exist.

Policy 7.3 details the approach to the planning and procurement of school bus services.

Community transport services

Auckland Transport and Auckland Council recognise that the public transport network described in this Plan, including the scheduled services described in Appendix 1, may not provide adequate coverage for all parts of the region.

Rural communities, in particular, receive limited service from the public transport network as extending regular scheduled services into these areas is not generally cost-effective.

Policy 7.5 describes how Auckland Transport will work with local communities to identify appropriate public transport solutions that can be self-sustaining in the longer term.

Page 92

8 Implementation plan

This chapter sets out a proposed timetable for the implementation of the major actions in this RPTP, including the staging of changes to the service network, and associated infrastructure investments. It also shows how Auckland Transport intends to involve the public in the detailed process of service changes.

8.1 Implementation timetable

The changes to the network structure outlined in this Plan represent a significant change to the way in which public transport services are delivered in the Auckland region.

Timing of implementation

Implementation across the whole region will require a detailed assessment of the specific route structure in each area. This will require input from communities to ensure that local needs are identified and taken into account. To achieve this, a staged implementation of the new network structure is proposed, with three main stages to be designed, procured, and implemented over a three-year period:

  • Stage 1 (2014–15): South Auckland

  • Stage 2 (2015): North Auckland

  • Stage 3 (2014–2016): Central, East and West Auckland

When the three-stage implementation of the new service network is complete, an integrated all day network of services (see Figure 5-5) will be in place.

Beyond 2016, significant further improvements will be enabled by the implementation of the City Rail Link. This will provide an underground rail connection from Britomart to the Western Line near Mt Eden and enable rail services to be through-routed

Page 93

in the central city. This will deliver a major boost in rail system capacity and dramatically improve the accessibility of the city centre and other key centres by public transport. When complete, the City Rail Link will enable further changes to be made to the wider public transport network, including:

  • Increased service frequencies to the rail network as journey times from areas such as Manurewa, New Lynn and Henderson improve

  • Some reduction of growth in bus numbers as rail access to the city centre improves

These changes are illustrated in the indicative 2022 all-day network (see Figure 5.6). The service changes outlined above are indicative only, and will be incorporated into a new RPTP that will be prepared when the initial three-stage implementation of the new service network is in place.

Table 8-1 below indicates the timing of the key components required to deliver an integrated network of services over the 10-year life of the RPTP. Staging of the key components is contingent on receiving funding in time.

Page 94

Table:

Table 8-1: Integrated network staging: key components

Transcriber's Note: The table has been converted to text. Note to table follows. End Note.

*'essential infrastructure' means infrastructure required in advance in order to operate proposed services.

  • Integrated ticketing (AIFS) implementation: 2013–2014

  • Introduce appropriate fare structure (subject to business case and funding): 2014

  • Stage 1 network changes: 2013–2014

  • Stage 2 network changes: 2014–2015

  • EMU introduction, rail capacity and service increase: 2014–2016

  • Stage 3 network changes: 2014–2016

  • Implement essential infrastructure* for Stages 1 to 3: 2013–2016

  • Implement essential infrastructure* towards mature 2022 service network: 2016–2022

  • Service network changes towards 2022 network (dependent on City Rail Link implementation): 2019–2022

  • Panmure to Pakuranga busway operational (AMETI): 2019–2022

  • City Rail Link operational, rail capacity and service increase (subject to funding) 2021–2022

  • Ongoing interchange and selected infrastructure improvements: 2013–2022

  • Selected bus priority and operational improvements to maximise the benefits of the new service network: 2013–2022

  • Selected customer improvements: 2013–2022

End Table.

In addition to the projects outlined in Table 8-1, route protection is being undertaken for the following projects during the life of this RPTP:

  • Rail to Auckland Airport

  • Waitemata Harbour Crossing

  • Rail to the North Shore

  • Avondale–Southdown rail corridor.

Prioritisation of infrastructure programme

Table 8-2 below shows the integrated infrastructure programme required to deliver the proposed new network over a 10-year period. The table has a particular focus on the prioritised requirements of Stages 1 to 3 of the proposed service network changes. Each infrastructure project is filtered by the level of relative priority within a constrained funding environment:

a. 'Essential' means required in advance in order to run the proposed services or the project significantly enhances patronage growth

b. 'Highly desirable' means crucial projects to maximise the benefits of the proposed services in terms of patronage growth and/or enhanced connection environment between services

c. 'Desirable' means useful projects that complement the proposed services, e.g. by improving customer experience.

However, it should be noted that all these projects are required to enable the full benefits of the proposed service changes to be realised.

Table 8-2 also shows the delivery date by which the infrastructure project needs to be operational to align with the planned staging of proposed service changes. The table does not purport to be fully comprehensive but does cover all public transport modes, and includes Park-and-Ride.

Page 95

Funding of infrastructure programme

The proposed new network is to be delivered within the middle of the Regional Land Transport Programme 2012–2015 cycle. Table 8-2 below shows the estimated capital funding implications associated with the delivery of the new network. Whether or not the required project is reflected in the current Regional Land Transport Programme is indicated. In many cases, the identified project is so recent that projects have not been fully scoped, but capital costs are estimated based on current knowledge. These projects will be further scoped as part of the development of the new Regional Land Transport Plan to be prepared in 2015. The current Regional Land Transport Programme funding component is subject to change via the Regional Land Transport Programme variation process.

Including the City Rail Link, Table 8-2 signals that more than $3.8b of public transport investment is required over the next 10 years, excluding land costs. With the exclusion of City Rail Link-related projects and any land costs, over $1.0b of investment is needed during the next decade to support the proposed service changes.

Pages 96–99

Table:

Table 8-2: proposed infrastructure programme for new network (prioritised)

Transcriber's Note: The table has been split into six tables by region. The number of columns have been rationalised. End Note.

Regionwide

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Integrated ticketing (AIFS)

Essential

Delivers integrated ticketing solution across Auckland for all bus, rail and ferry services

2014/15

Y1–3; Y4–10

$31m

Electric trains

Essential

Improved efficiency and effectiveness of rail services on the network spine

2014/15–2016/17

Y1–3; Y4–10

$500m

Electric train depots

Essential

Essential infrastructure associated with electric trains

2014/15

Y1–3

$178m

Integrated fares

Essential

Remove financial transfer penalties that currently exist in the system, thus encouraging connections

2014/15

Not present

$3m

City Rail Link (subject to funding)

Essential

Maximises rail network capacity supporting a transformative increase in rail services across the region. The bus network is being redesigned to take full advantage of the benefits that City Rail Link will bring to overall Auckland public transport network

2021/22–2022+

Y1–3; Y4–10

$2,800m

Bus priority measures

Highly desirable

Ongoing programme to enhance bus-service reliability through provision of selected bus lanes, intersection priority and other interventions

2013/14–2022+

Y1–3 In part; Y4–10 In part

$20m

Public transport customer experience improvement

Highly desirable

Ongoing programme of selected customer facilities upgrades to improve connection/waiting environments and information provision

2013/14–2022+

Y1–3 In part; Y4–10 In part

$10m

Designation and land purchase

Highly desirable

Future-proofing selected parts of permanent network (Rapid and Frequent) for efficient and effective delivery, as appropriate

2013/14–2022+

Not present

Not scoped

Park and Ride investigations

Highly desirable

Ongoing programme of investigation into feasibility of new/expanded Park and Ride facilities to enhance patron growth

2013/14–2022+

Not present

$2m

Rail station upgrade programme

Desirable

Ongoing programme of 14 rail station upgrades to enhance customer environment

2013/14–2015/16

Y1–3

$50m

Bus stop and shelter capital programme

Essential

Ongoing programme to improve, upgrade and relocate bus stops and shelters across Auckland to facilitate good-quality access, better connection environment and enhanced waiting facilities

2013/14–2015/16

In part

$30m

Footnote 8: Estimates based on current pre-feasibility planning adjusted by Auckland Transport Infrastructure Assets Revaluation 2011 report figures, where appropriate. Land cost is not included. End Footnote.

Southern Auckland

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Otahuhu Bus–Train Interchange

Essential

Essential element to allow implementation of Southern Network. Off-road bus-to-train interchange facility

2014/15

Y1–3

$8m

Otahuhu Town Centre bus stops

Essential

On-street replacement facilities for current Otahuhu Bus Station

2014/15

Y1–3; Not present

$1.5m

Pukekohe Station

Essential

Essential element to allow full implementation of Southern Network. Pedestrian overbridge and bus interchange required on western side of Pukekohe rail station

2014/15

Y1–3

$10m

Middlemore Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports the implementation of Southern Network. Improved western access to train station and bus-to-train interchange facilities upgrade

2014/15

Not present

$0.5m

Manukau Bus Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports effective implementation of Southern Network. Off-road bus-to-bus interchange facility, adjacent to rail station

2014/15

Y1–3

$10m

Papatoetoe Station

Highly desirable

Supports the implementation of Southern Network. Upgraded bus stop facilities to improve bus to train interchange environment

2014/15

Not present

$1m

Mangere Town Centre

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Southern Network through easier connections. Upgraded bus-to-bus connection and waiting environment

2014/15

Not present

$2m

Mangere Bridge

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Southern Network. Upgraded bus-to-bus connection and waiting environment

2014/15

Not present

$0.4m

Manurewa Station

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Southern Network. Upgraded bus-to-train connection and waiting

2014/15

Not present

$0.2m

Papakura Station

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Southern Network. Bus-to-train connection environment enhancement as part of station upgrade

2013/14

Y1–3

$0.4m

Drury Station and Park and Ride

Essential

New rail station and Park and Ride facility to support major growth area. Park and Ride upstream of motorway congestion with good access to Rapid rail services. Dependent upon electric train services reaching Drury

Blank

Blank

$6m

Homai Station Interchange

Highly desirable

Enhanced bus–train connection facilities at Homai Station

2014/15

Not present

$1.5m

Takanini Station

Desirable

Supports implementation of Southern Network. Bus turning circle and waiting area at end of Station Road

2014/15

Not present

$1m

Massey Road – Buckland Road Neighbourhood Interchange

Highly desirable

Amendments to bus stop locations at this intersection and creation of a neighbourhood interchange to facilitate connection between Frequent bus services

2014/15

Not present

$2m

Western Auckland

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Te Atatu Bus Interchange

Essential

Essential for full implementation of Western Network. Off-road bus-to-bus interchange. To be developed as part of NZTA Te Atatu Motorway Interchange project

2016/17

Y1–3

$10m

Triangle Road Bus Interchange

Essential

Essential for full implementation of Western Network. Off-road/on-road bus-to-bus interchange

2015/16

Y1–3

$4m

Westgate Bus Interchange

Essential

Significant for full implementation of Western Network. Off-road bus-to-bus interchange integrated into new Westgate Town Centre as part of the town centre redevelopment project

2015/16

Y1–3

$8m

SH16 bus lanes – Waterview to Te Atatu

Highly desirable

Bus shoulder lanes, enhancing service capacity being delivered as part of NZTA Causeway Upgrade project

2015/16

Blank

NZTA funded

Henderson Bus Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports full implementation of Western Network. Upgrade of existing bus interchange facilities to improve customer waiting/connection

2013/14

Not present

$0.2m

Bus connection improvements

Highly desirable

Range of projects to allow for better bus-to-bus connection environments in town centres (Glendene and Glen Eden) and at rail stations (Sunnyvale and Ranui)

Blank

Not present

$1m

Westgate Park and Ride

Essential

New Park and Ride facility to support major growth area upstream of road congestion with access to Frequent bus services

Blank

Not present

$1.2m

Central Auckland

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Wynyard Quarter Bus Interchange

Essential

Essential element for full implementation of Central Network. Off-road bus-to-bus interchange in vicinity of Fanshawe Street/Halsey Street

2015/16

Y1–3 In part

$30m

City Centre bus infrastructure

Essential

Various projects currently being scoped to support successful bus operations of the new network in the Central City

2013/14–2015/16

Y1–3

$3m

Panmure Interchange (AMETI)

Essential

Significant project for full implementation of Central and Eastern Networks. Bus-to-train and bus-to-bus interchange at Panmure Station. Part of Auckland – Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative project.

2016/17

Y1–3; Y4–10

$17.5m

Britomart Interchange

Essential

Essential long-term project to support City Rail Link project. Better bus to train interchange at Britomart and large bus layover facilities.

2021/22–2022+

Not present

Not scoped

Aotea Interchange

Essential

Essential long-term project to support City Rail Link project. Better bus-to-train interchange at proposed Aotea City Rail Link Station

2021/22–2022+

Not present

Not scoped

Karangahape Road Interchange

Essential

Essential long-term project to support City Rail Link project. Better-bus-to train interchange at proposed Karangahape City Rail Link Station

2021/22–2022+

Not present

Not scoped

Newton Interchange

Essential

Essential long-term project to support City Rail Link project. Better bus-to-train interchange at proposed Newton City Rail Link station

2021/22–2022+

Not present

Not scoped

Newmarket Interchange

Highly desirable

Support full implementation of Central Network Better bus-to-train interchange at Newmarket train station

2016/17

Not present

$2m

Grafton Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports full implementation of Central Network Better bus-to-train interchange at Grafton Train Station as part of The University of Auckland's campus development project

2015/16

Not present

$5m

Blockhouse Bay Town Centre

Highly desirable

Project to allow for a better-bus-to bus connection environment

2015/16

Not present

$0.5m

St Lukes Road

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network. Better bus-to-bus interchange environment at St Lukes Mall and bus-priority measures on Morningside Drive/St Lukes Road

2015/16

Not present

$3m

Onehunga Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central/Southern Networks. Upgrade of existing bus interchange and enhanced interchange at Onehunga Train Station

2013/14

Not present

$0.7m

Sylvia Park

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central/Southern Networks. Upgrade of existing bus interchange and enhanced bus interchange at Sylvia Park Train Station

2014/15

Y1–3; Y4–10

$1m

Balmoral Road bus connection improvements

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network Redesign intersections at Dominion, Mt Eden and Manukau Roads to facilitate better bus-to-bus connection environment

2015/16

Not present

$3m

Mt Albert Road bus connection improvements

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network. Redesign intersections at Dominion, Mt Eden and Sandringham Roads to facilitate better bus-to-bus connection environment.

2015/16

Not present

$3m

Pt Chevalier Shops

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network Redesign of Great North Road/Carrington Road intersection to facilitate better bus to bus connection environment

2015/16

Not present

$1m

Avondale Interchange and Park and Ride

Highly desirable

Supports full implementation of Central/Western Networks. Off-road bus-to-train interchange with adjacent Park and Ride

2015/16

Y4–10

$3m

Ellerslie Town Centre

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network Enhance bus-to-bus connection environment in town centre

2014/15

Not present

$0.4m

Glen Innes Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Central Network Enhance bus-to-train connection environment at Glen Innes Station

2015/16

Not present

$0.5m

Parnell Station

Highly desirable

New train station

2016/17

Y1–3

$18m

Waterview Green Bridge

Desirable

Great North Road public transport, walk and cycle overbridge to provide better connectivity to Unitec

2015/16

Not present

$6m

Downtown Ferry Terminal

Desirable

Enhancements to Downtown Ferry Terminal

2016/17

Y1–3; Y4–10

$7m

Eastern Auckland

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Panmure to Pakuranga Busway (AMETI)

Essential

Construction of dedicated busway between Panmure and Pakuranga

2019/20

Y1–3; Y4–10

$14m

Pakuranga Plaza (AMETI)

Essential

Significant project for full implementation of Eastern Network. Upgrade of existing bus interchange facilities at Pakuranga Town Centre

2016/17

blank

$5m

Botany Town Centre

Highly desirable

Supports implementation of Eastern Network Upgrade of existing bus interchange facilities at Botany Town Centre

2014/15

Y1–3

$0.5m

Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

Highly desirable

Improvements to passenger and vehicular ferry terminals

2016/17

Y1–3; Y4–10

$11m

Northern Auckland

Project

Priority

Functional requirement

Delivery target

Regional land transport programme 2012–2015 status

Estimated capital cost in 10-year programme (See Footnote 8)

Hibiscus Coast Busway Station and Park and Ride

Essential

Essential element for full implementation of Northern Network. Bus-to-bus interchange and Park and Ride at Silverdale. Park and Ride to support major growth area upstream of road congestion with access to Frequent bus services.

2014/15

Y1–3

$5m

Constellation to Albany Busway

Highly desirable

Extension of dedicated busway between Constellation and Albany stations for significant improvements to Northern Busway operations

Blank

Not present

NZTA funded

Akoranga Busway Station improvements

Highly desirable

Significant for full implementation of Northern Network. Provides for northbound access to Akoranga Station from Esmonde Road to allow for greater operational flexibility

2015/16

Not present

$1m

Takapuna Bus Interchange

Highly desirable

Supports full implementation of Northern Network Upgrade of current facility to allow better connection environment between bus services in Takapuna

2014/15

Not present

$0.5m

Bus connection improvements

Highly desirable

A range of projects to support better bus-to-bus connection environments in Milford, Northcote, Highbury, Glenfield and Albany Centre

Blank

Not present

$3m

Silverdale bus interchange

Highly desirable

On-road bus-to-bus interchange to facilitate implementation of Northern Network

2015/16

Y1–3

$0.15m

Devonport Ferry Terminal

Desirable

Enhancements to Devonport Ferry Terminal

2016/17

Y1–3; Y4–10

$4.5m

Northern Busway – additional stations

Desirable

New busway stations to improve catchment of Northern Busway services

2022+

Y4–10

$5m

End Table.

8.2 Service design and subsequent review process

Implementing the network changes described above will require significant public consultation.

The statutory consultation undertaken on this Plan provided an opportunity for key stakeholders, interest groups and the wider public to provide feedback and input on the core structure of the new network in broad terms (but not on specific local details such as detailed routing, the mixture of local services, location of stops and other infrastructure matters).

Local service design

Feedback on specific local details will be sought through local targeted engagement exercises that will be undertaken prior to procurement of services as part of the PTOM contracting process.

The detailed service specifications will be prepared in collaboration with key stakeholders, operators and Auckland Transport. These will be made more widely available to other stakeholders, existing and potential users, and persons who may be affected by, or have an interest in, the proposed service design in the affected areas.

Following these targeted engagement exercises, refined service proposals will be evaluated for their affordability and then procured through the PTOM process.

Service review process

The PTOM partnership between Auckland Transport and the service operator provides the opportunity for regular performance reviews and continuous improvement. Information from this process will be used to monitor the performance of individual routes, PTOM units, and the network as a whole.

Where minor amendments to service levels, timings and/or routings cannot address identified problems, a route or group of routes may be subjected to a more comprehensive service review process.

This service review process would essentially follow the process described above for the initial local-level service planning exercise, with an additional final step to secure approval from the Auckland Transport Board and NZTA for any changes that have financial implications for total expenditure and/or cost-recovery ratios.

Page 100

Glossary

All-day network: The network of rapid, frequent, connector services that operate at the minimum stated frequency throughout the day. The target all-day operating period for frequent services is between 6am and 9pm, seven days a week (with lower frequencies outside these times). This will be phased in as funding and demand allow, with an initial target by 2016 of 7am to 7pm on weekdays, and specific time coverage at weekends subject to service demand.

AT HOP card: A stored-value smartcard that can be used to pay fares on buses, trains and ferries participating in Auckland Transport's integrated ticketing system.

Auckland Plan: A comprehensive long-term strategy, required by legislation, that directs Auckland's growth and development up to 2040. It includes social, economic, environmental and cultural goals and identifies existing and future locations of critical infrastructure facilities, including transport. It was adopted by Auckland Council in May 2012.

City Rail Link: A proposed 3.5 kilometre double-track underground rail tunnel beneath the city centre from Britomart to the Western Line near Eden Terrace, with three city-centre underground stations.

Connector Network: Bus and ferry corridors with some priority measures connecting with activity centres, town centres and metropolitan centres. Provides access to more frequent services.

Council Controlled Organisation: An organisation in which a local authority controls 50 per cent or more of the votes, or has the right to appoint 50 per cent or more of the directors or trustees.

Exempt service: A public transport service that is exempt under Section 130(2) of the LTMA or deemed exempt under Section 153(2) of the LTMA. Exempt services are not provided under contract to Auckland Transport and, unless specified otherwise, are not subject to the objectives and policies in this Plan.

Farebox recovery: A policy that provides for public transport operating costs to be shared equitably between users and funders, to reflect the private and public benefits received, having regard to the objectives and circumstances of their region.

Farebox Recovery Ratio: The proportion of total operating costs recovered from users through fares and SuperGold card payments.

Ferry Standard: A standard for new vessels to be used in future contracts for the provision of ferry services.

Frequent Network: A network of major bus and ferry corridors connecting the city centre, metropolitan centres and other major centres, providing at least a 15-minute service all day (initially from 7am to 7pm), with significant priority measures.

Page 101

Government Policy Statement: A document that highlights the Government's outcomes and priorities for the land transport sector, and sets out its broad transport funding allocations over the next decade.

Integrated Transport Programme: A plan produced by Auckland Transport and NZTA with the support of Auckland Council. It coordinates, prioritises and sequences the strategic activities of Auckland's transport network providers, over the next 30 years, that are required to deliver the spatial development needs set out in the Auckland Plan.

National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy: A strategy to promote energy efficiency, energy conservation and renewable energy in New Zealand.

National Land Transport Programme: A prioritised nationwide three-year programme of roading and transport projects that allocates central government funding.

Partnering Agreement: A mid-level contract document between Auckland Transport and operators, specific to each operator. It contains the key deliverables associated with working in a PTOM environment and includes a greater level of detail than the Regional Agreement.

Public Transport Operating Model: A framework for building a long-term public-private partnership between regional councils and public transport operators with two overarching objectives: to grow the commerciality of public transport services and create incentives for services to become fully commercial, and to grow confidence that services are priced efficiently and that competitors have access to public transport markets.

Rapid Network: Rail and busway corridors providing dedicated right-of-way connections between the city centre and other selected centres, providing frequent and reliable services (at least a 15-minute service all day, initially from 7am to 7pm).

Real-Time Passenger Information System: An electronic system linked to automatic vehicle location devices on public transport vehicles that provides real-time arrival information on electronic displays at transport interchanges and stops.

Regional Agreement: The highest level of commercial agreement between Auckland Transport and providers of public transport services. It sets the overall framework for the provision of PTOM-contracted public transport services and is signed by all operators.

Regional Land Transport Plan: A statutory plan that will be prepared by Auckland Transport under the LTMA, which sets out the region's land transport objectives, policies and measures for at least 10 years; includes a statement of priorities and provides a financial forecast of anticipated revenue and expenditure on activities. The plan forms the basis of Auckland Transport's request for funding allocations in the National Land Transport Programme. It replaces the previous Regional Land Transport Programme.

Regional Land Transport Strategy: A statutory document that sets regional objectives and policies for the region's transport system from 2010 to 2040. It was adopted by (former) Auckland Regional Council in 2010. Following the recent amendment to the LTMA, the RLTS is no longer required, and any RPTP adopted after 30 June 2015 will no longer be required to give effect to the public transport components of the RLTS.

Regional Public Transport Plan: A statutory document describing how Auckland Transport will give effect to the public transport components of the 2010 Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy. It also specifies the public transport services proposed for the region, and the policies that apply to those services.

Requirements for Urban Buses: New Zealand's common standard for urban bus quality. It sets out the common dimensions and features of an urban bus and is used by Auckland Transport in urban bus contracts.

SuperGold card: A national identification card that provides free off-peak travel on bus, rail and ferry services to people aged 65 or older.

Total Mobility: A subsidised transport scheme for those with impaired mobility who have difficulty with, or are unable to use, scheduled public transport services.

Unit: As defined in Section 5 of the LTMA, a public transport service, or group of public transport services:

a. that Auckland Transport identifies as integral to the region's public transport network and

b. that operates, or will operate, on the entire length of 1 or more routes specified in RPTP and

c. that includes all of the public transport services operating to a timetable that applies to the entire route or routes specified for the unit

Unit Agreement: The lowest level of contractual document between Auckland Transport and operators. It contains the details and targets for the operation of each specific unit (e.g. the routes, timetables, vehicle requirements and KPI goals for each unit).

Unitary Plan: A Resource Management plan that will replace District Plans, setting out rules and regulations controlling all planning activities and development in Auckland which will give effect to the strategic direction of the Auckland Plan.

Vehicle Quality Standards: Standards that may be set by Auckland Transport for specific services, in addition to the national Requirements for Urban Vehicles.

Pages 103–104

Acronyms

AIFS: Auckland Integrated Fare System

AMETI: Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative

ARTA: Auckland Regional Transport Authority

CRL: City Rail Link

EMU: Electric Multiple Unit

FRR: Farebox recovery ratio

GPS: Global Positioning System

ITP: Integrated Transport Programme

KPI: Key performance indicator

LCN: Local Connector Network

LTMA: Land Transport Management Act 2003

NEECS: National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy

NITIS: National Integrated Ticketing Interoperability Standards

NZTA: New Zealand Transport Agency

PTOM: Public Transport Operating Model

QTN: Quality Transit Network

RLTP: Regional Land Transport Plan

RLTS: Regional Land Transport Strategy

RPTP: Regional Public Transport Plan

RTN: Rapid Transit Network

RTPIS: Real-Time Passenger Information System

TAAG: Transport Accessibility Advisory Group

Pages 105–126

Transcriber's Note: Print Page 124 is a duplicate of Page 122 and has been omitted. End Note.

Appendix 1: Proposed future service network

This appendix presents details of proposed future services that are integral to the Auckland public transport network. It includes descriptions of the routes, frequencies and hours of operation of units. Four deemed exempt services are also included in this appendix: these are integral to the regional network, but are not part of any unit. Total Mobility taxi/shuttle service providers are also listed.

The service levels described in this appendix are targets for 2016, and are subject to funding.

All frequencies are in minutes unless otherwise stated.

Bus Services – scheduled services and school services

Route numbers for scheduled services will be confirmed post-tendering of services

Nite Rider services are to be confirmed for unit allocation purposes at a later date

Table:

Transcriber's Note: The table has been broken into separate tables by unit. Note that units are not necessarily consecutive. End Note.

Unit 1 – City LINK

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

City Link. Wynyard Quarter to Karangahape Rd via Queen St

blank

5

7.5

10

7.5/10

7.5/10

Unit 2 – Inner LINK

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Inner Link. Britomart, Three Lamps, Ponsonby, Grafton, Newmarket, Parnell and to Britomart

blank

10

15

15

15

15

Unit 3 – Richmond Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Grey Lynn to Auckland University via Richmond Rd and Grey Lynn

blank

10

15

30

30

30

St Lukes to Auckland University via Richmond Rd and Grey Lynn

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Westmere to Auckland University via Williamson Ave and Freemans Bay

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Benson Rd to Karangahape Rd via Remuera, Hobson Bay, Eastern Parnell, Auckland University, Freemans Bay and Howe St

blank

30

60

60

60

60

008 – Parnell to Auckland Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

011 – Newton to Mt Albert Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

012 – Downtown to St Marys College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

015 – Britomart to Auckland Girls Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

029 – Parnell to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

062 – Ponsonby to Western Springs College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

008 – Auckland Grammar to Parnell

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

012 – St Marys College to Downtown

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Western Springs College to Herne Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

029 – Epsom Schools to Parnell

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 4 – Great North Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

New Lynn to City via Great North Rd

blank

6

10

15

15

15

Unit 6 – New North Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Avondale Peninsula to Wynyard Quarter via Rosebank Rd, St Lukes and Auckalnd University

blank

5

12

15

15

15

001 – Mt Albert Grammar to Midtown

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – Mt Albert Grammar to Downtown

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 7 – Sandringham Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

New Lynn to Wynyard Quarter via Sandringham Rd and Auckland University

blank

10

15

15

15

15/30

Avondale, New Windsor to Wynyard Quarter via St Lukes and Auckland University 15 Avondale, New Windsor to St Lukes

blank

30

30

60

30

30

010 – Sandringham to Ponsonby Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

041 – Mt Albert to Mt Albert Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

202 – New Windsor to Auckland Girls Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

010 – Ponsonby Intermediate to Sandringham

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

041 – Mt Albert Grammar to Mt Albert

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

202 – Auckland Girls Grammar to New Windsor

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 8 – Dominion Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

New Lynn to Wynyard Quarter via White Swan Rd Dominion Rd and Auckland University

blank

10

15

15

15

15

Lynfield to Wynyard Quarter via Dominion Rd Extension, Dominion Rd and Auckland University

blank

10

15

15

15

15

Mt Roskill to Wynyard Quarter via Dominion Road

blank

10

15

blank

blank

blank

019 – Lynfield to Waikowhai Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

267 – Mt Roskill Grammar to Lynfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 9 – Mt Eden Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Waikowhai via Hillsborough Rd to Britomart via Mt Eden Rd and Symonds St

blank

5

15

15

15

15

Waikowhai via Melrose Rd to Britomart via Mt Eden Rd and Symonds St

blank

5

15

15

15

15

031 – Mt Roskill to Epsom and Remuera Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

099 – Lynfield to Auckland Grammar and St Peters

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Waikowhai Intermediate to Lynfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

031 – Remuera/Epsom Schools to Mt Roskill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

032 – Epsom Girls to Waikowhai

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

099 – St Peters & Auckland Grammar to Lynfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

099 – St Peters & Auckland Grammar to Lynfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 10 – Manukau Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Onehunga to Wynyard Quarter via Manukau Rd

blank

5

10

15

15

15

Unit 12 – Remuera Road

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Mt Albert to Glen Innes via Pt Chevalier, Herne Bay, Auckland University, Parnell and Remuera Rd

blank

15

15

15

15

15

Pt. Chevalier Beach to City and Auckland University, via Jervois Road

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Meadowbank to Ponsonby via City and Auckland University

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

009 – Remuera to Auckland Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

010 – Remuera to Auckland Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Kohimarama to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Downtown to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Ellerslie to Remuera Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Remuera to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

023 – Herne Bay to Epsom Girls Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – Remuera to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

051 – Kohimarama to Kadimah College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

073 – Meadowbank to St Thomas Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

074 – Remuera to Selwyn College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Epsom Schools to Glen Innes

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Auckland Grammar to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

010 – Auckland Grammar to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Sacred Heart College to Parnell

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Remuera Primary to Ellerslie

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Sacred Heart College to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

023 – Epsom Girls Grammar to Herne Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – Epsom Schools to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

045 – Selwyn College to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

051 – Kadimah College to Kohimarama

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

055 – Selwyn College to Meadowbank

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

071 – Glendowie College to Ellerslie

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

072 – Glendowie College to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

073 – St Thomas Primary to Remuera

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 14 – Mt Wellington

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Otahuhu to Sylvia Park via Panama Rd

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Sylvia Park to Ellerslie

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Ellerslie to Glen Innes

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Sylvia Park to Glen Innes

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Panmure to Glen Innes to Meadowbank (St John's circuit)

blank

15

30

30

30

30

022 – Panmure to Baradene College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

061 – Panmure Town Centre to Ellerslie/Penrose Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

062 – Mt Wellington to Ellerslie/Penrose Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – Mt Wellington to St Marys School (Ellerslie)

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

071 – Ellerslie to Glendowie College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Baradene College to Panmure

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

027 – Glendowie College to Otahuhu Transport Centre

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

036 – De La Salle College to Pt England

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

046 – Selwyn College to Panmure

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

047 – Selwyn College to Panmure

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

061 – One Tree Hill College to Panmure Town Centre

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

062 – One Tree Hill College to Mt Wellington South

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – Ellerslie Primary to Mt Wellington

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – One Tree Hill College to Mt Wellington

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

065 – Panmure District School to Mt Wellington

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

065 – One Tree Hill College to Bailey Road School – Penrose

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 16 – Tamaki

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Glen Innes to City via St Heliers and Tamaki Drive

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Riddell Rd to City via St Heliers and Tamaki Drive

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Glen Innes to city via Wai-o-toki Bay and Kepa Rd

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Glen Innes to City via Long Drive

blank

15

30

blank

blank

blank

Glen Innes to Mission Bay via Long Drive

blank

blank

30

30

30

30

Bastion Pt to Glen Innes via Mission Bay

blank

20

30

60

30/60

30/60

007 – Glen Innes to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – St Heliers to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

015 – St Heliers to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

016 – St Heliers to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Mission Bay to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – St Heliers to Baradene College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

055 – Kohimarama to Remuera Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

625 – Glen Innes Centre to Glendowie College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

001 – Epsom Schools to Kohimarama

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

002 – Epsom Schools to St Heliers

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

003 – Epsom Schools to St Heliers

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

004 – Epsom Schools to St Heliers

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

005 – Epsom Schools to Glendowie

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Epsom Schools to Mission Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Sacred Heart College to Glen Innes Village

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

008 – Orakei Primary to Kohimarama

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

011 – St Ignatius School to Glendowie

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Baradene College to St Heliers

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

055 – Remuera Intermediate to Kohimarama

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

056 – Remuera Intermediate to Kohimarama

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 17 – Hospitals

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Hospitals. Remuera to Britomart via Ascot, Greenlane and Auckland Hospitals

blank

60

60

60

60

60

Unit 18 – Mt Eden Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Mt Eden Crosstown. Wynyard Quarter to Mission Bay via Kingsland, Mt Eden Village, Remuera and Orakei Station

blank

15

20

30

30

30

006 – St Lukes to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

006 – Epsom Schools to St Lukes

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 19 – Balmoral Rd Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Balmoral Road Crosstown. Pt. Chevalier to Orakei

blank

10

15

15

15

15/30

007 – Epsom to Mt Albert Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Balmoral to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

030 – Balmoral to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Sacred Heart College to Balmoral

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Mt Albert Grammar to Epsom

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

030 – Epsom Schools to Mt Eden

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 20 – Mt Albert Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Mt Albert Rd Crosstown. Mt Albert to Pakuranga via Onehunga

blank

10

15

15

15

15/30

Unit 21 – Stoddard Rd Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Stoddard Rd Crosstown. Triangle Rd to Onehunga via Rosebank Rd and Avondale

blank

15

30

30

30/60

30/60

Avondale to New Lynn via Avondale Peninsula

blank

30

30

60

60

60

248 – Blockhouse Bay to Blockhouse Bay Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Lynfield to Blockhouse Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 22 – Hillsborough Rd Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Hillsborough Rd Crosstown. New Lynn to Onehunga and Sylvia Park

blank

15

30

30

30/60

30/60

Hillsborough Rd Crosstown. New Lynn to Onehunga and Otahuhu

blank

15

30

60

60

60

Unit 24 – Waiheke

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

O'Brien Rd. Omiha Bay to Matiatia Ferry Terminal

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Donald Bruce Rd. Kennedy Point to Matiatia Ferry Terminal

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Seaview Rd. Onetangi to Matiatia Ferry Terminal

blank

30

60

60

60

60

094 – Palm Road to Waiheke Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

094 – Waiheke Primary to Palm Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 25 – Titirangi

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

New Lynn to Avondale via Green Bay and Blockhouse Bay

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Golf Road to New Lynn

blank

30

60

60

60/120

60/120

French Bay to New Lynn via Golf Rd

blank

30

60

60

120

120

South Titirangi Rd to New Lynn via Titirangi Rd

blank

60

60

60

60

60

Glen Eden Station to New Lynn via Titirangi Village and Titirangi Rd

blank

60

60

60

60

60

Woodlands Park Rd to New Lynn via Titirangi Village and Titirangi Road

blank

60

60

60

60

60

Brains Park to New Lynn via Nikau St

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

Titirangi Shops to City via Green Bay and Blockhouse Bay Rd

blank

20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

006 – New Lynn/Titirangi to Remuera Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Glen Eden to Green Bay High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Kaurilands to Green Bay High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

008 – New Lynn Transport Centre to Blockhouse Bay Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Green Bay to Glen Eden Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

179 – Titirangi Village to Avondale College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

179x – Titirangi to Avondale College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

006 – Remuera Schools to Titirangi/New Lynn

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

008 – Blockhouse Bay Intermediate to New Lynn

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Blockhouse Bay Intermediate to Green Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

013 – Green Bay High to New Lynn Transport Centre

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Glen Eden Intermediate to Green Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

179 – Avondale College to Titirangi Village

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

179x – Avondale College to Titirangi

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 26 – Waikumete

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

New Lynn to Triangle Rd via Great North, Henderson and Lincoln Rd

blank

10

12

15

15

15/30

New Lynn to Westgate via Great North Rd, Henderson, Lincoln Rd, Triangle Rd Interchange and Massey

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Henderson to New Lynn via Glengarry Rd and Glen Eden

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Henderson to New Lynn via Rosier Rd and Glen Eden

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Henderson to New Lynn via Glendene

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Henderson circuit via Sunnyvale and McLaren Park

blank

60

60

N/A

60 (day)

60 (day)

007 – Henderson Valley to Green Bay High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Henderson Valley to Kelston Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – Henderson to Avondale College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

072 – Glendene to Waitakere Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Ls7 – Parrs Park to Liston College/Holy Cross School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Green Bay High to Henderson Valley

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

012 – Kelston Schools to Henderson

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

013 – Kelston Schools to Glen Eden

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Kelston Schools to Te Atatu South

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Kelston Schools to Henderson Valley

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

030 – Waitakere Schools to Kelston

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – Avondale College to Henderson

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

115 – Waitakere Schools to New Lynn Transport Centre

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

156 – Avondale College to Forest Hill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

189 – Kelston Boys-Girls and Intermediate to New Lynn

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

LS7 – Liston College to Oratia

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

TP1 – Tirimoana Primary to Sabulite Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 27 – Te Atatu

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Te Atatu Peninsula to Henderson via Te Atatu Rd

blank

15

15

15

15

15/30

Te Atatu Peninsula to Henderson via Edmonton Rd

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Te Atatu Peninsula to City via Northwestern Motorway

blank

10

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Glendene roundabout to City via Te Atatu Rd and Northwestern Motorway

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Henderson to City via Edmonton Road and Northwestern Motorway

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

013 – New Lynn to Rutherford College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – Henderson to Rutherford College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Te Atatu Peninsula to Kelston Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Henderson to Rangeview Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

RU812 – Swanson to Rutherford College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

013 – Rutherford College to New Lynn

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – Rutherford College to Henderson

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Kelston Schools to Te Atatu Peninsula

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Rangeview Intermediate to Henderson and Glendene

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

040 – Waitakere Schools to Te Atatu South

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

LS1 – Holy Cross School to Liston College

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

RU812 – Rutherford College to Swanson

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 28 – Ranui

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Henderson West Circuit. Via Henderson Valley Rd, Summerland Dr, Simpson Rd and Sturges Rd

blank

20

30

60

30/60

30/60

Ranui to Henderson via Birdwood Rd loop, Universal Drive and Triangle Rd Interchange

blank

20

30

60

30/60

30/60

Waitakere to Henderson via Swanson Station and Rathgar Rd

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Ranui to City via Universal Drive and Northwestern Motorway

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

018 – Ranui to Kelston Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

LS6 – Candia Rd to Liston College/Holy Cross School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

AV1 – Opanuku Rd to Avondale College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

AV2 – Ranui to Avondale College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 8 – Swanson Station to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 14 – Falls Rd/Anzac Valley to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 100 – Te Atatu Peninsula to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 200 – Rathgar Rd to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

018 – Kelston Schools to Ranui

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

LS6 – Liston College to Candia Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

AV1 – Avondale College to Garelja Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

AV2 – Avondale College to Ranui

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 8 – Massey High to Swanson

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 14 – Massey High to Falls Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 100 – Massey High to Te Atatu

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA 200 – Massey High to Ranui

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 29 – Hobsonville

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Westgate to Hobsonville Ferry Terminal via West Harbour and Hobsonville

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Westgate to Hobsonville Ferry Terminal via Whenuapai and Herald Island

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Royal Heights loop. Royal Heights to Westgate

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Westgate to Triangle Rd via Don Buck Dr and Universal Dr.

blank

10

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

050 – West Harbour to Holy Cross School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

HP1 – Massey West to Hobsonville Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA5 – Luckens Rd to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA6 – Hobsonville Rd to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA10a – Royal Heights to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

RU810 – Westgate to Rutherford High School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

050 – Holy Cross School to West Harbour

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

HP1 – Hobsonville Primary to Massey West

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA5 – Massey High to Luckens Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA6 – Massey High to Hobsonville Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA10a – Massey High to Royal Heights

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA10b – Massey High to Westgate

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

RU810 – Rutherford High to Westgate

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 30 – North Western Motorway

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Northwestern Motorway. Westgate to Britomart via Triangle Rd interchange, Te Atatu motorway interchange and Great North Rd

blank

7.5

15

15

15

15

Huapai to Westgate

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Helensville to Westgate

blank

30

60

60

60

60

MA13 – Waimauku to Massey High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

MA13 – Massey High to Waimauku

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116 – Greenhithe to Albany Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116x – Greenhithte to Albany Junior High (Express)

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116x – Greenhithe to Albany Schools (Express)

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

122 – Whenuapai to Albany Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116 – Albany Junior High to Greenhithe

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116 – Albany Senior High to Greenhithe

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116 – Albany Junior High to Greenhithe

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

116x – Albany Junior High to Greenhithe (Express)

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

122 – Albany Schools to Whenuapai

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

042 – Albany to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

060 – Meadowood Drive to Albany Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

060 – Meadowood Drive to Albany Senior High

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

061 – Albany Heights to Albany Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

070 – Oakway Drive to Upper Harbour Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

013 – Rangitoto College to Unsworth Heights

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Westlake Schools to Albany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

042 – Westlake Schools to Albany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

060 – Albany Schools to Meadowood Drive

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

060 – Albany Senior High to Meadowood Drive

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

061 – Albany Schools to Albany Heights

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

070 – Upper Harbour Primary to Oakway Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 33 – Upper Harbour Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Henderson to Constellation Station via Don Buck Rd, Hobsonville Rd and Greenhithe

blank

20

30

60

30/60

30/60

Greenhithe to Constellation and City

blank

20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

008 – Bayview to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

012 – Spinella Dr. to Glenfield Intermediate and Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

008 – Westlake Schools to Bayview

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

011 – Glenfield College to Bayview

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

015 – Northcote College to Wairau Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

036 – St Marys College to Bayview

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 34 – North Harbour

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Birkenhead Wharf to Albany via Highbury, Glenfield, Constellation and Massey University

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Constellation Station to Albany via Massey University

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Constellation Station to Takapuna via Unsworth

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Constellation Station to Albany via Snapper Rock and Albany Highway

blank

15

30

30

30/60

30/60

Constellation Station to Albany via Rosedale Road

blank

15

30

60

60

60

Constellation Station to City (continuation of full buses from Snapper Rock or Rosedale)

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Unit 35 – Bayview

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Bayview to City via Highbury

blank

15

30

30

30/60

30/60

Windy Ridge to City via Highbury

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

009 – Glenfield to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

018 – Wairau Valley to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Northcote to Northcote Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

035 – Glenfield to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

037 – Glenfield to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

053 – Unsworth to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

074 – Glenfield Shops to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

078 – Unsworth to Glenfield College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

081 – Hillcrest to Northcote Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Westlake Schools to Glenfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

032 – St Marys and Northcote Intermediate to Hillcrest

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

046 – Carmel College and Westlake Girls to Glenfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

048 – Westlake Boys to Totaravale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

055 – Westlake Schools to Wairau Corner

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

056 – Carmel College to Totaravale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

072 – Northcote College to Hillcrest

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

074 – Westlake Schools to Glenfield Shops

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

078 – Glenfield College to Totaravale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

081 – Northcote College to Hillcrest

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 36 – Beach Haven to Takapuna

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Beach Haven to Takapuna via Windy Ridge and Glenfield

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

006 – Beach Haven to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Salisbury Rd to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Onewa Road to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Beach Haven to Rosmini, St Josephs and Takapuna Normal

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

077 – Verrans Corner to Glenfield Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

003 – Carmel College and Westlake Girls to Chatswood

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

006 – Westlake Boys to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

009 – Westlake Girls to Verrans Corner Via Northcote Point

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

010 – Westlake Girls to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Rosmini College & Takapuna Normal to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

027 – Carmel College to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

033 – Rosmini College & Takapuna Normal to Verrans Corner

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

077 – Glenfield Schools to Verrans Corner

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

077 – Glenfield Schools to Verrans Corner

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 37 – Akoranga West

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Smales Farm, Glenfield, Coronation, Sunnybrae, Akoranga, Takapuna

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

Akoranga to Constellation via Northcote, Hillcrest, Link Drive

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

Hillcrest to circuit to city

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

Sylvan Avenue to city

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Beach Haven to Takapuna via Highbury, Northcote and Akoranga

blank

30

30

60

30/60

30/60

001 – Beach Haven to Birkenhead College and Birkdale Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

002 – Coronation Rd to Birkenhead College and Birkdale Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

14 – Beach Haven to Northcote Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

079 – Chatswood to Birkenhead Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

080 – Chatswood to Northcote Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

001 – Birkenhead College to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

002 – Birkenhead College & Birkdale Intermediate to Coronation Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

004 – Birkenhead College to Highbury

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

005 – Birkenhead Primary to Maritime Tce

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – Northcote College to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

023 – Birkdale Intermediate to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Birkdale Intermediate to Highbury

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – St Marys & Northcote Intermediate to Chatswood

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

029 – St Marys & Northcote Intermediate to Maritime Tce

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

030 – Northcote College to Chatswood

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

035 – St Marys to Beach Haven

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 38 – Birkenhead to Takapuna

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Highbury to North Shore Hospital via Northcote and Smales Station

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Unit 39 – Birkenhead to City

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Birkdale Rd to the City

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Rangatira Rd to the City

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Chatswood to Highbury

blank

30

60

60

N/A

N/A

Verbena Road to Highbury

blank

30

60

60

N/A

N/A

Highbury to City (full bus from either Chatswood or Vebena Road)

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Highbury to Newmarket via Ponsonby Rd

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Unit 40 – Northern Express 1

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Northern Express 1. Albany Station to Britomart via Busway and Fanshawe St

blank

5

10

15

10/15

15/30

Northern Express 1. Silverdale Station to Britomart via Busway and Fanshawe St

blank

10

30

30

30

30

Unit 41 – Northern Express 2

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Northern Express 2. Albany Station to Universities via Wellesley St

blank

7.5

15

30

15

15

Unit 42 – Albany to Newmarket via Ponsonby

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Albany Station to Newmarket via Ponsonby Rd and Auckland City Hospital

blank

10

30

n/a

n/a

n/a

064 – Albany to Epsom Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

064 – Epsom Schools to Albany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 43 – Devonport

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Devonport Ferry Terminal to Constellation Station via Takapuna and Smales Farm Station

blank

10

15

30

15/30

15/30

Bayswater Ferry Terminal to Milford via Hauraki, Takapuna, Smales Farm Station and Nile Road

blank

30

30

60

30

30

Stanley Point to Devonport Ferry Terminal and Vauxhall

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Belmont to City

blank

30

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

017 – Devonport to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Bayswater to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

062 – Takapuna to Takapuna Grammar

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

080 – Devonport to Belmont Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

081 – Stanley Bay to Belmont Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

082 – Stanley Bay to Belmont Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

083 – Devonport to Belmont Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

087 – Stanley Bay to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Westlake Schools to Devonport

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

080 – Takapuna Grammar to Devonport

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

081 – Belmont Intermediate to Stanley Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

082 – Takapuna Grammar to Stanley Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

083 – Takapuna Grammar to Devonport

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

084 – Belmont Intermediate to Devonport

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

087 – Westlake Schools to Stanley Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

089 – Takapuna Normal Intermediate to Devonport

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

813 – Takapuna Grammar to Takapuna

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 44 – Lower East Coast Bays

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Mairangi Bay to Auckland University via Beach Rd, Milford, Takapuna and Akoranga Station

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Constellation Station to Auckland University via East Coast Rd, Milford, Takapuna and Akoranga Station

blank

30

30

30

30

30

Mairangi Bay to Britomart via Beach Rd, Milford and Smales Farm Station

blank

20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

East Coast Rd to Britomart via Forrest Hill and Smales Farm Station

blank

20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Albany to Takapuna via East Coast Rd, Forrest Hill and Smales Farm Station

blank

30

30

30

30/60

30/60

014 – Mairangi Bay to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

016 – Rothesay Bay shops to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

023 – Takapuna to East Coast Bays Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

027 – Milford to East Coast Bays Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – Sunnynook to East Coast Bays Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

042 – Milford to Campbells Bay Primary

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

051 – Sunnynook to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

052 – Wairau Valley to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

053 – Campbells Bay to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

054 – Sunnynook to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

014 – St Josephs School to Sunnynook

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – St Josephs School to Milford and Takapuna

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

023 – Westlake Schools to Totaravale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – Rangitoto College to Sunnynook

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

029 – Westlake Schools to Rothesay Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

034 – Westlake Boys High to Milford and Takapuna

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

042 – Campbells Bay Primary to Milford

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

052 – Westlake Schools to Sunnynook

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

053 – Westlake Schools to Campbells Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

054 – St Johns School to Milford

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

057 – Westlake Schools to Glenfield

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

066 – Rangitoto College to Takapuna

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

073 – Westlake Schools to Totaravale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 45 – Upper East Coast Bays

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Albany to Constellation Station via Browns Bay and Mairangi Bay

blank

10

15

15

15/30

15/30

Albany Station to Constellation Station via Long Bay, Browns Bay and Rosedale Rd

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Constellation Station to City

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Long Bay to Albany via Glenvar

blank

15

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Oaktree Ave. Long Bay to Albany Station via Beach Rd and Browns Bay

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Fairview Loop circuit. Lonely Track Rd loop

blank

30

60

60

60

60

028 – Long Bay College to Northcross Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

031 – Pinehill to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

033 – Long Bay to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

041 – Torbay to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

048 – Northcross to East Coast Bays Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

049 – Kowhai Rd to Long Bay College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

071 – Pinehill to Long Bay College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

015 – Long Bay Primary to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Westlake Schools to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

026 – Westlake Girls to Pinehill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

028 – Northcross Intermediate to Long Bay College

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

031 – St Johns School to Forrest Hill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

032 – Westlake Boys to Browns Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

033 – Westlake Boys to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

045 – Long Bay College to Windsor Park

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

049 – St Josephs School and Rosmini College to Browns Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

050 – Westlake Schools to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

053 – Long Bay College to Murrays Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

058 – Torbay School to Long Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

059 – Rangitoto College to Browns Bay shops (via East Coast Rd)

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

060 – St Johns School to Pinehill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

061 – Rangitoto College to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

062 – Rangitoto College to Browns Bay shops(via Beach Rd)

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

063 – Northcross Intermediate to Torbay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

069 – St Johns School to Albany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

070 – Long Bay College to Browns Bay Shops

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

071 – Long Bay College to Pinehill

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

875 – Westlake Girls to Browns Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 46 – Hibiscus Coast

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Whangaparaoa Rd. Gulf Harbour to Orewa via Silverdale

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Hibiscus Coast Highway. Manly to Waiwera via Silverdale

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Dairy Flat Highway. Silverdale to Albany Station

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Whangaparaoa circuit. Polkinghornes Bay to Silverdale via Vipond Rd and Red Beach

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Millwater circuit. Orewa to Silverdale via Millwater

blank

30

60

60

60

60

002 – Hatfields Beach to Orewa Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

004 – Army Bay to Orewa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

005 – Arkles Bay/Manly to Orewa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

006 – Stanmore Bay/Vipond Rdto Orewa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Brightside Rd to Orewa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Silverdale to Whangaparaoa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

018 – Orewa to Whangaparaoa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Army Bay to Whangaparaoa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Whangaparaoa College to Gulf Harbour School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Gulf Harbour to Whangaparaoa College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Orewa Via Hatfields Beach to Stella Maris School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Gulf Harbour to Stella Maris School

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

002 – Orewa Schools to Hatfields Beach

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

004 – Orewa College to Army Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

005 – Orewa College to Arkles Bay/Manly

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

006 – Orewa College to Stanmore Bay/Vipond Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

007 – Orewa College to Brightside Rd

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

017 – Whangaparaoa College to Silverdale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

018 – Whangaparaoa College to Orewa

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Whangaparaoa College to Army Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Gulf Harbour School to Whangaparaoa College

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

020 – Whangaparaoa College to Gulf Harbour

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Stella Maris School to Orewa Via Hatfields Beach

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

022 – Stella Maris School to Gulf Harbour

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 47 – Hibiscus Coast Schools

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

024 – Manly to Takapuna Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Orewa to Long Bay College, Northcross Intermediate and Rangitoto College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

026 – Gulf Harbour to Long Bay College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

027 – Stanmore Bay to Northcross Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

045 – Orewa to Westlake Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

046 – Orewa to Westlake Boys and Rosmini College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

047 – Gulf Harbour to Westlake Girls and Carmel College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

024 – Takapuna Schools to Manly

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

025 – Long Bay College, Northcross Intermediate and Rangitoto College to Orewa

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

026 – Long Bay College to Gulf Harbour

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

027 – Northcross Intermediate to Stanmore Bay

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

044 – Westlake Girls to Silverdale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

045 – Westlake Schools to Silverdale

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

046 – St Josephs School and Rosmini College to Orewa

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

047 – Carmel College and Westlake Girls to Gulf Harbour

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

049 – Westlake Boys to Manly

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 48 – Warkworth

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Warkworth to Silverdale Park and Ride Station

blank

60

120

120

120

120

Unit 50 – Ti Rakau Drive

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Britomart to Howick via Ti Rakau Drive, Botany Town Centre and Whitford Road

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Britomart to Ormiston Town Centre via Ti Rakau Drive, Botany Town Centre, Kilkenny Drive and Mission Heights

blank

15

30

30

30

30

Unit 52 – Howick to Panmure

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Panmure to Howick Beach via Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal

blank

15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Howick to Sylvia Park via Wellington St, Cascade Drive and Reeves Rd

blank

30

60

60

60

60

Bucklands Beach to Panmure

blank

30

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

014 – Botany Downs to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

016 – Howick to Sacred Heart College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

313 – Star Of The Sea School to Highland Park

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

321 – Glen Innes to Edgewater College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

016 – Sacred Heart College to Howick

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

019 – Sacred Heart College to Dannemora

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

021 – Sacred Heart College to Bucklands Beach

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

080 – Macleans College to Panmure

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

085 – St Marks School to Pakuranga

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

320 – Edgewater College to Glen Innes

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 53 – Botany Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Manukau to Howick via Botany Town Centre and Meadowland Drive

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15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Manukau to Bucklands Beach via Botany Town Centre and Highland Park

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15

30

60

30/60

30/60

Botany Town Centre to Manukau via Ormiston Town Centre

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15

30

60

30/60

30/60

018 – Highland Park to Sancta Maria College

Morning

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blank

blank

blank

blank

072 – Highland Park to Howick Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

078 – Golflands to Farm Cove Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

088 – Pakuranga to Sancta Maria College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

089 – Botany Downs to Sancta Maria College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

302 – Dannemora to Macleans College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

314 – Botany to Howick Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

315 – Smales Rd to Somerville Intermediate and Howick College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

317 – Dannemora to Somerville Intermediate

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

317 – Accent Dr to Howick Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

317 – Redcastle Drive to Howick Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

317 – Baverstock Rd to Howick Schools

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

322 – Smales Rd to Somerville Intermediate and Howick College

Morning

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

018 – Sancta Maria College to Highland Park

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

075 – Bucklands Beach Intermediate to Highland Park

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

078 – Farm Cove Intermediate to Golflands

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

081 – Macleans College to Botany Downs

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

082 – Macleans College to Dannemora

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

082 – Macleans College to Botany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

088 – Sancta Maria College to Pakuranga

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

089 – Sancta Maria College to Botany Downs

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

309 – Howick College to Kilkenny Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

310 – Howick College to Mirrabooka & Burswood Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

311 – Howick College to Dannemora Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

314 – Owairoa Primary to Botany

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

314 – Somerville Intermediate to Golflands

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

315 – Somerville Intermediate to Dannemora

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

316 – Somerville Intermediate to Kilkenny And Middlefield Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

317 – Somerville Intermediate to Redcastle Dr

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

318 – Somerville Intermediate to Kilkenny

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

319 – Aviemore Dr to Burswood

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

323 – Howick Intermediate to Botany Downs

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

324 – Farm Cove Intermediate to Botany Downs

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

325 – Star Of The Sea School to Cockle Bay & Golflands

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

326 – Macleans College to Bucklands Beach

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

700 – Sancta Maria College to North Park

Afternoon

blank

blank

blank

blank

blank

Unit 54 – East Tamaki Crosstown

Route description

Time of day (school services)

Mon–Fri peak frequency

Mon–Fri off-peak frequency

Mon–Fri evening frequency

Sat frequency day/evening

Sun frequency day/evening

Botany Town Centre to Middlemore Hospital via Highbrook and Otara

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15

30

60

30/60

30/60