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Auckland Transport

Franklin Road design

Since December 2015 the design of the preferred option has been progressed. This includes further consideration of the design at side road intersections as well as the roundabout at the Wellington Street intersection.

Artist impression of Franklin Road


Detailed design


Key features of the design include:

  • 3.5m wide asphalt footpaths.
  •  Asphalt vehicle entrances.
  • Contrasting color permeable paving car parks.
  • Tree pits.
  • More pedestrian crossing facilities at No.14 Franklin Road and at the Wellington St roundabout.
  • Slightly raised cycle path on both sides of the road.
  • 2.1m wide painted median.
  • Roundabout at the Wellington St / England St / Franklin Road intersection.
  • Raised speed tables at all side road intersections.

Cycleway

The cycle path on both sides of the road will be 1.5m wide and:

  • Be raised slightly above the road by between 50mm to 70mm with a rounded kerb profile easy for cyclists to negotiate.
  • Have 0.6m buffers each side.
  • Include cycle symbols at 60m intervals with a thin green line between cycle symbols adjacent to the buffer zone.

Parking areas

Parking areas will be a contrast colour permeable pavement to help define the carpark areas and have lower ongoing maintenance costs. Timber wheelstops will allow water to runoff across the parking bays.

Tree pits and kerblines

We will have a ‘toolbox’ of approved tree pits and each tree will be assessed individually. Where possible, we will include some low planting around trees, but we wont be able to achieve this for every tree because each tree is different.

Kerbs will be bluestone to maintain the heritage character of the area.

Side street treatments

All side streets will have raised speed tables at the same level as the footpaths. This increases safety for pedestrians and slows traffic entering and exiting side streets.

Wellington Street intersection

A roundabout will be constructed at this intersection and will include:

  • A small fully mountable central island so buses and trucks can easily maneuver through the intersection.
  • Raised speed tables on each approach to manage speed.
  • Pedestrian crossings on each leg.

A roundabout will be significantly better at managing queuing during peak times, be safer for pedestrians, and allow all movements from England St (currently restricted).

Traffic signals were also considered but were not progressed for a variety of reasons, including the reduced visibility of the signals themselves as a result of the trees.

Roundabouts are not as easy for cyclists to get through and around and we have provided two options for cyclists in this design. The raised cycle path will stop just before the roundabout and connect to the footpath. It will re-join the road after the roundabout. Cyclists can choose to either join the traffic flow, staying on the road to get through the roundabout, or move up onto the footpath, cross using the pedestrian crossing then rejoin the cycle path once through the roundabout.

Wellington Street intersection

Street lighting

Because of the trees, designing street lighting is challenging. Conventional lighting columns can be used at the Wellington St intersection, but along the rest of the street 3 options have been considered.

Option A – Conventional lighting columns

Advantages

Cheaper to implement

Disadvantages

    • The trees make it difficult to achieve good lighting coverage with this option as the lighting columns can’t be evenly spaced. This will provide inconsistent lighting levels on road and footpaths.
    • There will be ongoing and frequent tree maintenance to ensure luminaires are clear of foliage.
    • Lighting columns for foothpath lighting may need to be located close to property boundaries which increases the potential for light spill into properties.

Option B – Catenary system

This system provides wires across the road supported on poles either side of the road. The light luminaire is then hung off the wires over the centre of the carriageway. There are examples of catenary footpath lighting in the Viaduct Quarter.

Advantages

    • Provides consistent lighting along the whole road.
    • Uneven spacing of the wire support poles is OK so they can be located to avoid tree trunks and driveways.
    • The trees will be trimmed along the centre of the road above luminaires to provide maximum clearance above road level.
    • Significantly less ongoing tree maintenance.
    • Potential to utilise support poles for Christmas decorations.
    • Catenary lighting on footpaths will mean footpaths are clear of poles.

Disadvantages

    • Higher installation cost.
    • Overhead wires along the footpath and road.

Option C – Catenary on the road and bollard lighting on the footpath

This option uses the catenary system to light the road the same as Option B, but low bollards (approx. 1.3m high) along the footpath about every 15m.

Advantages

    • Provides consistent lighting along the whole road.
    • Uneven spacing of the wire support poles is OK so they can be located to avoid tree trunks and driveways.
    • The trees will be trimmed along the centre of the road above luminaires to provide maximum clearance above road level.
    • Significantly less ongoing tree maintenance.
    • Potential to utilise support poles for Christmas decorations.
    • No overhead wires over the footpath.
    • Can be located at the property boundary facing the footpath so no light spill onto properties.

Disadvantages

    • Would likely have uneven spacing due to driveways.

For more information

Contact Auckland Transport