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Auckland Transport

Northcote Safe Cycle Route

The Northcote Safe Cycle Route is 5.2 kilometres of walking and cycling improvements along Northcote Road, Lake Road, and Queen Street on the North Shore.


Project status: Construction
Project zone: North


Project overview

The Northcote Safe Cycle Route stretches from the Taharoto Road/Northcote Road intersection (near Smales Farm) to Northcote Point Ferry Terminal.

There are currently limited or no dedicated cycling facilities along the route, which services many attractions that could be accessed by bike, including schools, places of employment, public transport interchanges, leisure and shopping centres.

The walking and cycling improvements along the route will improve the safety of pedestrians and cyclists and implement this section of the Auckland Cycle Network.

See a map of the Northcote Safe Cycle Route (PDF 87KB)

Benefits

  • Make it easier and safer for cyclists and pedestrians, including school children.
  • Encourage more people to walk and cycle.

Timeframe

Construction began in April 2017 and will be completed by mid to late 2018.


Project details


The improvements include both on-road and off-road walking and cycle facilities. Some of the key changes include:

  • An off-road shared walking and cycling path on either side of Northcote Road from the Taharoto Road/Northcote Road intersection to the Northcote Road/Ocean View Road/Lake Road intersection.
  • Improvements to walking and cycling facilities at the Northcote Road/Ocean View Road/Lake Road roundabout.
  • An on-road cycle lane on either side of Lake Road and an off-road shared walking and cycling path on the eastern side of Lake Road from the Northcote Road/Ocean View Road/Lake Road intersection to Exmouth Road/Raleigh Road/Lake Road intersection.
  • Improvements to walking and cycling facilities at the Exmouth Road/Raleigh Road/Lake Road roundabout.
  • An on-road cycle lane on the western side of Lake Road and an off-road shared walking and cycling path on the eastern side of Lake Road from the Exmouth Road/Raleigh Road/Lake Road intersection to the Lake Road/Onewa Road intersection.
  • Improvements to walking and cycling facilities at the Lake Road/Onewa Road/Queen Street intersection.
  • A mix of improvements to encourage more cycling along Queen Street, including on-road cycle lanes, off-road cycle paths, off-road shared walking and cycling paths, and speed-calming measures.

Design drawings

Each section has been designed to the requirements of the location.

Construction

The Northcote Safe Cycle Route will be built in 5 sections. 

  • Construction will begin with Section 5, starting in April 2017 and finishing in July 2017.
  • Stage 1 work will take place from 3 July to 30 November 2017.
  • Stage 4 work will take place from 3 July to 12 December 2017.
  • Stage 2 works are currently being planned to minimise disruption to the public, local residents, and businesses.

Key dates for construction activities

  • Week commencing 3 July: site establishment and traffic management set-out (minor pedestrian changes and a shoulder closure).
  • Week commencing 10 July: stage 1A along Northcote Rd, from Taharoto Rd to motorway.
  • Week commencing 31 July: stage 1B along Northcote Rd, from motorway to Sunnybrae Rd/Akoranga Dr.
  • Week commencing 11 September: stage 1C along Northcote Rd, from Suunybrae Rd/Akoranga Dr to Lake Rd/Ocean View Dr, and stage 1D intersection of Northcote Rd/Sunnybrae Rd/Akoranga Dr.
  • Week commencing 18 September: stage 1E intersection of Northcote Rd/Lake Rd/Ocean View Dr.
  • Week commencing 9 October: line-marking.

SkyPath

The Northcote Safe Cycle Route is independent of the SkyPath project, but will be able to accommodate anticipated increases in people on bikes using this route if SkyPath is implemented. The main objective of this project is to encourage more local trips to be taken by bike.

Speed-calming measures for lower Queen Street

The improvements planned for lower Queen Street form part of the wider Northcote project, which has been developed in consultation with the local community.

Taking previous feedback on board, AT changed the designs originally proposed for the lower Queen Street section of the cycle route, replacing the cycle lanes with speed-calming measures. The revised designs reduced the removal of on-street parking to 14 spaces (compared to the originally-proposed removal of 120 car parks) and also included the creation of 14 new parking spaces on Rodney Road.

AT received concerns from some residents about the revised designs. As a result, we developed further speed-calming design options for lower Queen Street. From 17 October to 20 November 2016, we asked for feedback to help us select the best designs for implementation.

Results of speed-calming consultation

After careful consideration of all feedback submissions, we have decided to proceed with Option 1 of the proposed speed calming measures, which consists of 2 traffic lanes and 2 speed cushions, for all locations.

Option 1: two lanes, two speed cushions.

Lower Queen Street speed calming measures

This option lowers traffic speeds by installing a raised speed cushion in each traffic lane. Raised islands on either side of the speed cushions create a small section of protected cycle lane (cycle bypass) on both sides of the road. This option reduces the width of each traffic lane, but 2-way traffic flow is retained.

Pros:

  • Two-way traffic flow through the devices (one lane in each direction).
  • Reduces traffic speeds, but not as effectively as Option 2.
  • Planted islands create a greener environment (less planting than Options 2 and 3).

Cons:

  • Narrower traffic lanes make it more difficult for large vehicles to navigate through the devices.
    Wider speed cushions.
  • Two traffic lanes mean vehicles are likely to stay closer to the road edge. Between speed calming devices, this reduces separation from vehicles for people on bikes.
  • Smaller side islands reduce space between people on bikes and parked cars. This increases the risk of opening doors into people on bikes.
  • Narrower islands between the cycle bypass and the traffic lane creates less of a buffer from traffic for people on bikes and means the island cannot be planted.
  • Narrower cycle bypasses.

Get detailed plans of option 1 - locations 1 to 8 (PDF 6.1MB)

Why we are installing speed-calming measures

  • Create a slower speed environment so people on bikes and motorists can share the road safely. This will also create a safer and more enjoyable environment for other vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and children.
  • Speed surveys show that the average vehicle speed along this section of the road is 51km/h. A safe speed for people on bikes and motor vehicles to share the road is considered to be 30km/h or lower.
  • At faster than 30km/h the risk of a fatality from a vehicle collision with a pedestrian or cyclist increases sharply. At a speed of 30km/h the probability of a fatality in a crash is around 15 percent; at 50km/h the probability of a fatality increases to over 80 percent.
  • In this location, physical measures to reduce traffic speeds is preferred over speed-limit reductions as they are effective without constant police enforcement.
  • Each speed-calming device includes raised planted islands that will help create an even greener-looking environment.

Changes to parking

The revised designs require the removal of 12 on-street parking spaces (2 less than the previous design) and still include the creation of 14 new parking spaces on Rodney Road. Parking surveys show that after the removal of 12 on-street parking spaces, there will still be enough capacity to accommodate current parking demand.

Further research about crashes

For more information on the relationship between speed and accidents on our roads, please read the report from the Accident Compensation Corporation and the Land Transport Safety Authority.

Down with Speed: A Review of the Literature, and the Impact of Speed on New Zealanders (PDF 963KB)


Previous public engagement and consultation options

AT sought public feedback on the Northcote Safe Cycle Route from 28 July until 29 August 2014.

Summary of feedback, AT's responses, and changes to the proposal

In total, 790 feedback responses were received, including one submission from local residents that included a petition containing 1,400 signatures. We have carefully considered the feedback received through the public engagement process and as a result:

  • Made 14 changes to the design of the cycle route – one of these changes includes the major redesign of facilities along Queen Street.
  • Initiated 3 further investigations – one of these investigations covers investigations into several cycle routes suggested by respondents.
  • Initiated 1 further action – this is an education campaign for residents prior to the cycle route being open for public use.

We also worked closely with Kaipatiki Local Board when developing the design for the cycle route and as a result the board now fully supports the project.

For a full summary of the feedback received, AT’s responses to feedback and the resulting changes to the cycle route please read the public feedback and decisions report:

Download the Northcote Safe Cycle Route public feedback and decisions report (PDF 952KB)

Detailed planning maps released during the public feedback period

The maps below are now out-of-date, but were the original designs for the cycle route which were released for public feedback from 28 July to 29 August 2014. For copies of maps showing the designs of the cycle route please refer to the detailed planning maps for implementation above.

Previously considered discounted options

  • Install dedicated cycle lanes as proposed in 2014. This option removed significant amounts of on-street parking and was strongly opposed by the community. Please refer to Section 4 of the detailed planning maps released during the public feedback period for illustrations of this option.
  • Install previous speed-calming measures as proposed in May 2015. This option was discounted for several reasons:
  1. It does not have protected cycle bypasses so are not as safe for people on bikes.
  2. The raise speed cushion is wider making it trickier for vehicles to navigate smoothly.
  3. The new designs occupy less space along the road and so can be easily fitted in between driveways. This helps to achieve a better spacing between speed calming devices, which discourages excessive acceleration and breaking.

    Please refer to Section 4 of the detailed planning maps for implementation for illustrations of this option.
  • Install chicanes. This option was discounted for several reasons:
  1. They require the removal of large amounts of on street parking.
  2. They force larger vehicles to stray into the path of oncoming people on bikes.
  3. The new designs occupy less space along the road and so can be easily fitted in between driveways. This helps to achieve a better spacing between speed-calming devices, which discourages excessive acceleration and breaking.

Previously considered speed-calming options

Option 2: one lane, one speed cushion.

Option 2 - Street View

This option lowers traffic speeds by using planted islands to narrow the road down to a single lane with a speed cushion. The design also includes cycle bypasses. Vehicles travelling in opposing directions will need to negotiate who goes through the speed calming device first. Once vehicles pass through the device, 2-way traffic flow resumes.

Pros:

  • The single traffic lane is wider than each of the 2 lanes in Option 1. This makes it easier to negotiate the devices for larger vehicles.
  • More effective at reducing traffic speeds than Options 1 and 2.
  • Narrower speed cushion is easier for vehicles to navigate.
  • A single traffic lane directs vehicles towards the centre of the road. Between speed calming devices, this increases separation from vehicles for people on bikes.
  • Planted islands create a greener environment.
  • Larger side islands increase space between people on bikes and parked cars. This decreases the risk of opening doors into people on bikes.
  • Wider islands between the cycle bypass and the traffic lane creates a greater buffer from traffic for people on bikes and means the island can be planted.
  • Wider cycle bypasses.

Cons:

  • One-way traffic flow requires vehicles from opposing directions to give way to each other (there is no set priority as to who goes first).

Get detailed plans of option 2 - locations 1 to 8 (PDF 7.75MB)

Option 3: one lane, no speed cushion.

Option 3 - Street View

This option lowers traffic speeds by using planted islands to narrow the road down to a single lane. The design also includes cycle bypasses, but does not include a speed cushion. Vehicles travelling in opposing directions will need to negotiate who goes through the speed calming device first. Once vehicles pass through the device, 2-way traffic flow resumes.

Pros:

  • The single traffic lane is wider than each of the two lanes in Option 1. This makes it easier to negotiate the devices for larger vehicles.
  • A single traffic lane directs vehicles towards the centre of the road. Between speed calming devices, this increases separation from vehicles for people on bikes.
  • Planted islands create a greener environment.
  • Larger side islands increase space between people on bikes and parked cars. This decreases the risk of opening doors into people on bikes.
  • Wider islands between the cycle bypass and the traffic lane creates a greater buffer from traffic for people on bikes and means the island can be planted.
  • Wider cycle bypasses.

Cons:

  • One-way traffic flow requires vehicles from opposing directions to give way to each other (there is no set priority as to who goes first).
  • As there is no speed cushion, some vehicles may not slow down to desired speeds (30km/h or lower) to pass through the speed calming device when there are no vehicles coming in the opposite direction.

Get detailed plans of option 3 - locations 2 to 7 (PDF 4.57MB)

Initial proposal for speed-calming measures

We identified 8 locations to install speed-calming measures with cycle bypasses and planted islands.

See a detailed map of the locations of speed-calming measures (PDF 262KB)

For locations 1 and 8

There are 2 design options (options 1 and 2). These treatments aim to create a ‘gateway’ to the area, signalling to motorists that they are entering a lower-speed environment.

For locations 2 to 7

There are 3 design options (options 1, 2, and 3). These treatments aim to create a slower-speed environment where people on bikes can safely share the road with vehicles. It will also create a safer environment for other vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and children.


For more information on this project

Contact Auckland Transport